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Author Notes:

Correspondence: Harlan P. Jones, Ph.D., Department of Immunology and Molecular Medicine, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Boulevard, Fort Worth, Texas, Telephone: (817) 735-2448, harlan.jones@unthsc.edu

The authors would like to extend a special thanks to Beau Aldridge and Jeff Moore for their assistance in the technical aspects of the experiments.

The authors would also like to extend thanks to the laboratory members of Robert Donahoe, Ph.D. for the use of the FACS apparatus as well Sandra Parks for her assistance in completion of this manuscript.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by the National Institutes of Health Grant 5 R01CA87923-03.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Immunology
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Lung
  • Metastasis
  • Stress
  • Immunity
  • NATURAL-KILLER-CELLS
  • REGULATORY T-CELLS
  • BREAST-CANCER
  • DENDRITIC CELLS
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS
  • COPING STRATEGIES
  • IMMUNE FUNCTION
  • OVARIAN-CANCER
  • SOCIAL STRESS

A role for B cells in facilitating defense against an NK cell-sensitive lung metastatic tumor is revealed by stress

Journal Title:

Journal of Neuroimmunology

Volume:

Volume 313

Publisher:

, Pages 99-108

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Stressors impair immune defenses and pose risks among cancer patients. Natural Killer cells are not the sole immune defense against tumor development. Utilizing an NK-sensitive tumor model, this study evaluated immune effects to stress and determined whether lung metastasis resulted from B cells' inability to augment tumorlytic function. Lung metastasis directly correlated with delayed lung B cell accumulation compared to NK, and T cells. Decreased interleukin-12 cytokine and CD80+ molecule expression by B cells correlated with decreased tumor lysis and increased tumor development. Thus, tumor defenses in the lung given stress exposure can depend on the B cell function.

Copyright information:

© 2017 Elsevier B.V.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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