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Author Notes:

Correspondence to: Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Room 105A, Whitehead Bldg., 615 Michael Street, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. E-mail address: aneish@emory.edu (A.S. Neish).

Acknowledgments: The Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC).

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

JDM is funded by a Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA, CDA#451678).

TMD is funded by a Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA).

RMJ is supported in part by NIH Grant RO1 CA179424 and R01DK098391.

ASN is supported, in part, by NIH R01DK071604 and RO1AI064462.

ARR is funded by T32DK007771-06 training grant.

BRR is funded by T32DK108735-03 training grant.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • FORMYL PEPTIDE RECEPTOR
  • REACTIVE OXYGEN
  • GUT MICROBIOTA
  • EPITHELIAL RESTITUTION
  • NADPH OXIDASE
  • ACTIVATION
  • ENDOSOMES
  • PROTEINS
  • INJURY
  • CELLS

Proteomic analysis of microbial induced redox-dependent intestinal signaling

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Journal Title:

Redox Biology

Volume:

Volume 20

Publisher:

, Pages 526-532

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Intestinal homeostasis is regulated in-part by reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are generated in the colonic mucosa following contact with certain lactobacilli. Mechanistically, ROS can modulate protein function through the oxidation of cysteine residues within proteins. Recent advances in cysteine labeling by the Isotope Coded Affinity Tags (ICATs) technique has facilitated the identification of cysteine thiol modifications in response to stimuli. Here, we used ICATs to map the redox protein network oxidized upon initial contact of the colonic mucosa with Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG). We detected significant LGG-specific redox changes in over 450 proteins, many of which are implicated to function in cellular processes such as endosomal trafficking, epithelial cell junctions, barrier integrity, and cytoskeleton maintenance and formation. We particularly noted the LGG-specific oxidation of Rac1, which is a pleiotropic regulator of many cellular processes. Together, these data reveal new insights into lactobacilli-induced and redox-dependent networks involved in intestinal homeostasis.

Copyright information:

© 2018 The Authors

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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