About this item:

61 Views | 50 Downloads

Author Notes:

henderj@stanford.edu

Conceptualization: Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites Sanabria, John D. Simeral, Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy, Jaimie M. Henderson.

Data curation: Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites Sanabria, Jad Saab.

Formal analysis: Paul Nuyujukian.

Funding acquisition: Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy, Jaimie M. Henderson.

Investigation: Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites Sanabria, Jad Saab, Chethan Pandarinath, Beata Jarosiewicz, Christine H. Blabe, Brian Franco.

Methodology: Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites Sanabria, Jad Saab, Chethan Pandarinath, Beata Jarosiewicz, John D. Simeral, Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy, Jaimie M. Henderson.

Project administration: John D. Simeral, Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy, Jaimie M. Henderson.

Resources: Stephen T. Mernoff, Emad N. Eskandar, John D. Simeral, Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy, Jaimie M. Henderson.

Software: Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites Sanabria, Jad Saab, Chethan Pandarinath, Beata Jarosiewicz.

Supervision: Paul Nuyujukian, Beata Jarosiewicz, John D. Simeral, Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy, Jaimie M. Henderson.

Validation: Paul Nuyujukian.

Visualization: Paul Nuyujukian, Jad Saab, Brian Franco.

Writing – original draft: Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites Sanabria.

Writing – review & editing: Paul Nuyujukian, Jose Albites Sanabria, Jad Saab, Chethan Pandarinath, Beata Jarosiewicz, Christine H. Blabe, Brian Franco, Stephen T. Mernoff, John D. Simeral, Leigh R. Hochberg, Krishna V. Shenoy, Jaimie M. Henderson

We would like to thank participants T6, T9, and T5 and their families for their dedication to this research.

We would also like to thank Tommy Hosman and Anish Sarma for their technical assistance in running sessions.

We greatly appreciate the work of Marguerite Bowker, Clinical Research Nurse Coordinator at Providence Veterans Affairs Medical Center, whose knowledge and skill have been essential to the successful participation of T9 in this study.

KVS is a consultant for Neuralink Inc. and on the Scientific Advisory Boards of Cognescent Inc. and Heal Inc.

JMH is a consultant for Circuit Therapeutics and Enspire DBS and is on the Surgical Advisory board of Neuropace Inc.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by the Stanford Medical Scientist Training Program to PN; Stanford Office of Postdoctoral Affairs and Craig H. Neilsen Foundation to CP; Stanford BioX-NeuroVentures, Stanford Neurosciences Institute, Garlick Foundation, and Samuel and Betsy Reeves to JMH and KVS; NIH-NIDCD R01DC014034 to JMH; NIH-NINDS R01NS066311 and Howard Hughes Medical Institute to KVS; NIH-NIDCD R01DC009899, Office of Research and Development, Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs (B6453R), MGH-Deane Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital Executive Committee on Research, and Joseph Martin Prize for Basic Research to LRH.

The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH, the Department of Veterans Affairs, or the US government.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • COMMUNICATION
  • INTERFACE
  • SYSTEM

Cortical control of a tablet computer by people with paralysis

Show all authors Show less authors

Tools:

Journal Title:

PLoS ONE

Volume:

Volume 13, Number 11

Publisher:

, Pages e0204566-e0204566

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

General-purpose computers have become ubiquitous and important for everyday life, but they are difficult for people with paralysis to use. Specialized software and personalized input devices can improve access, but often provide only limited functionality. In this study, three research participants with tetraplegia who had multielectrode arrays implanted in motor cortex as part of the BrainGate2 clinical trial used an intracortical brain-computer interface (iBCI) to control an unmodified commercial tablet computer. Neural activity was decoded in real time as a point-and-click wireless Bluetooth mouse, allowing participants to use common and recreational applications (web browsing, email, chatting, playing music on a piano application, sending text messages, etc.). Two of the participants also used the iBCI to “chat” with each other in real time. This study demonstrates, for the first time, high-performance iBCI control of an unmodified, commercially available, general-purpose mobile computing device by people with tetraplegia.

Copyright information:

This is an open access article, free of all copyright

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Universal : Public Domain Dedication License (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote