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Author Notes:

Correspondence should be addressed to Dr. Doris D. Wang, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, 505 Parnassus Avenue, M779, Box 0112, San Francisco, CA 94143-0112. doris.wang@ucsf.edu

Author contributions: D.D.W. wrote the first draft of the paper; D.D.W., C.d.H., J.L.O., N.B.G., M.S.L., and P.A.S. edited the paper; D.D.W. and P.A.S. designed research; D.D.W. and C.d.H. performed research; D.D.W., C.d.H., and S.M. contributed unpublished reagents/analytic tools; D.D.W. analyzed data; D.D.W. and P.A.S. wrote the paper.

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Subject:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by NIH R25 PAR-13-384 NINDS Grant and R01 NS090913-01.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • basal ganglia thalamocortical network
  • beta oscillations
  • dystonia
  • electrocorticography
  • local field potential
  • synchronization
  • LOCAL-FIELD POTENTIALS
  • HUMAN BASAL GANGLIA
  • SUBTHALAMIC NUCLEUS
  • ISOLATED DYSTONIA
  • SENSORIMOTOR CORTEX
  • MOVEMENT-DISORDERS
  • GAMMA OSCILLATIONS
  • FREQUENCY ACTIVITY
  • ESSENTIAL TREMOR
  • CEREBRAL-CORTEX

Pallidal Deep-Brain Stimulation Disrupts Pallidal Beta Oscillations and Coherence with Primary Motor Cortex in Parkinson's Disease

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

Volume:

Volume 38, Number 19

Publisher:

, Pages 4556-4568

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

In Parkinson’s disease (PD), subthalamic nucleus beta band oscillations are decreased by therapeutic deep-brain stimulation (DBS) and this has been proposed as important to the mechanism of therapy. The globus pallidus is a common alternative target for PD with similar motor benefits as subthalamic DBS, but effects of pallidal stimulation in PD are not well studied, and effects of pallidal DBS on cortical function in PD are unknown. Here, in 20 PD and 14 isolated dystonia human patients of both genders undergoing pallidal DBS lead implantation, we recorded local field potentials from the globus pallidus and in a subset of these, recorded simultaneous sensorimotor cortex ECoG potentials. PD patients had elevated resting pallidal low beta band (13–20 Hz) power compared with dystonia patients, whereas dystonia patients had elevated resting pallidal theta band (4–8 Hz) power compared with PD. We show that this results in disease-specific patterns of interaction between the pallidum and motor cortex: PD patients demonstrated relatively elevated phase coherence with the motor cortex in the beta band and this was reduced by therapeutic pallidal DBS. Dystonia patients had greater theta band phase coherence. Our results support the hypothesis that specific motor phenomenology observed in movement disorders are associated with elevated network oscillations in specific frequency bands, and that DBS in movement disorders acts in general by disrupting elevated synchronization between basal ganglia output and motor cortex.

Copyright information:

© 2018 the authors.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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