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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Tina V. Hartert, MD, MPH, Division of Allergy, Pulmonary, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 6107 Medical Center East, Nashville, TN 37232. tina.hartert@vanderbilt.edu.

Or: Suman R. Das, PhD, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, 1211 21st Ave South, Nashville, TN 37232. suman.r.das@vanderbilt.edu.

Disclosure of potential conflict of interest: C. Rosas-Salazar has received a grant from the Francis Family Foundation.

M. Shilts has received a grant and travel support from the National Institutes of Health.

A. Tovchigrechko has received grants from J. Craig Venter Institute and the National Institutes of Health and is employed by and receives stock/stock options from MedImmune LLC.

S. Schobel has received a grant from the J. Craig Venter Institute and the National Institutes of Health and is employed by the Henry M. Jackson Foundation.

J. Chappell has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

M. Moore has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health and is the founder of Meissa Vaccines.

R. Peebles has received a grant from the National Institutes of Health.

S. Das has received grants from the National Institutes of Health, Emergent Biosolution, Cargill, Abviro, and the Centers for Disease Control and is employed by Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

T. Hartert has received grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and is Associate Editor for the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

The rest of the authors declare that they have no relevant conflicts of interest.

Subject:

Research Funding:

This work was supported in whole or in part with federal funds from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under award numbers U19AI095227, K24AI77930, HHSN272200900007 C, and U19AI110819; the Vanderbilt Institute for Clinical and Translational Research grant support (National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, under award numbers UL1 TR000445 and U54RR24975); the Vanderbilt Faculty Research Scholars Program; and the Parker B. Francis Fellowship Program.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Microbiome
  • Lactobacillus
  • Staphylococcus
  • nasopharynx
  • respiratory syncytial virus
  • asthma
  • wheezing
  • 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing
  • infants
  • EARLY-LIFE
  • ASTHMA
  • CHILDREN
  • MICROBIOME
  • HOSPITALIZATIONS
  • STABILITY
  • SEVERITY
  • HEALTH
  • METAANALYSIS
  • ATOPY

Nasopharyngeal Lactobacillus is associated with a reduced risk of childhood wheezing illnesses following acute respiratory syncytial virus infection in infancy

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Journal Title:

Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Volume:

Volume 142, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 1447-+

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: Early life acute respiratory infection (ARI) with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) has been strongly associated with the development of childhood wheezing illnesses, but the pathways underlying this association are poorly understood. Objective: To examine the role of the nasopharyngeal microbiome in the development of childhood wheezing illnesses following RSV ARI in infancy. Methods: We conducted a nested cohort study of 118 previously healthy, term infants with confirmed RSV ARI by RT-PCR. We used next-generation sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene to characterize the nasopharyngeal microbiome during RSV ARI. Our main outcome of interest was 2-year subsequent wheeze. Results: Of the 118 infants, 113 (95.8%) had 2-year outcome data. Of these, 46 (40.7%) had parental report of subsequent wheeze. There was no association between the overall taxonomic composition, diversity, and richness of the nasopharyngeal microbiome during RSV ARI with the development of subsequent wheeze. However, the nasopharyngeal detection and abundance of Lactobacillus was consistently higher in infants who did not develop this outcome. Lactobacillus also ranked first among the different genera in a model distinguishing infants with and without subsequent wheeze. Conclusions: The nasopharyngeal detection and increased abundance of Lactobacillus during RSV ARI in infancy are associated with a reduced risk of childhood wheezing illnesses at age 2 years.

Copyright information:

© 2018 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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