About this item:

57 Views | 43 Downloads

Author Notes:

Corresponding author at: School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA, 30332, United States. stas@gatech.edu

The authors would like to thank Jane Chisholm of the Georgia Institute of Technology for her helpful review of the manuscript.

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health [CA149740, CA158598] and by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation [BCRF-17-043].

Keywords:

  • Spectroscopic photacoustic imaging
  • Oxygen saturation estimation
  • Optimal wavelength selection
  • Spectral unmixing

Impact of depth-dependent optical attenuation on wavelength selection for spectroscopic photoacoustic imaging

Tools:

Journal Title:

Photoacoustics

Volume:

Volume 12

Publisher:

, Pages 46-54

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

An optical wavelength selection method based on the stability of the absorption cross-section matrix to improve spectroscopic photoacoustic (sPA) imaging was recently introduced. However, spatially-varying chromophore concentrations cause the wavelength- and depth-dependent variations of the optical fluence, which degrades the accuracy of quantitative sPA imaging. This study introduces a depth-optimized method that determines an optimal wavelength set minimizing an inverse of the multiplication of absorption cross-section matrix and fluence matrix to minimize the errors in concentration estimation. This method assumes that the optical fluence distribution is known or can be attained otherwise. We used a Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in tissue with various depths and concentrations of deoxy-/oxy-hemoglobin. We quantitatively compared the developed and current approaches, indicating that the choice of wavelength is critical and our approach is effective especially when quantifying deeper imaging targets.

Copyright information:

© 2018 The Authors

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote