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Author Notes:

Theresa W. Gauthier, M.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia.

Financial Disclosure: The author declares that she has no competing financial interests.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Substance Abuse
  • Alcohol in utero
  • prenatal alcohol exposure
  • fetal alcohol effects
  • alcohol-related intrauterine disorder
  • fetal alcohol syndrome
  • fetal alcohol spectrum disorders
  • immune system
  • immune function
  • fetal development
  • prenatal development
  • pregnancy
  • premature birth
  • ACID ETHYL-ESTERS
  • UTERO ETHANOL EXPOSURE
  • ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE FUNCTION
  • NEONATAL RESEARCH NETWORK
  • GROUP-B-STREPTOCOCCUS
  • SURFACTANT PROTEIN-A
  • BIRTH-WEIGHT INFANTS
  • UNITED-STATES
  • YOUNG-CHILDREN
  • GLUTATHIONE AVAILABILITY

Prenatal Alcohol Exposure and the Developing Immune System

Tools:

Journal Title:

Alcohol Research Current Reviews

Volume:

Volume 37, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 279-285

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Evidence from research in humans and animals suggest that ingesting alcohol during pregnancy can disrupt the fetal immune system and result in an increased risk of infections and disease in newborns that may persist throughout life. Alcohol may have indirect effects on the immune system by increasing the risk of premature birth, which itself is a risk factor for immune-related problems. Animal studies suggest that alcohol exposure directly disrupts the developing immune system. A comprehensive knowledge of the mechanisms underlying alcohol's effects on the developing immune system only will become clear once researchers establish improved methods for identifying newborns exposed to alcohol in utero.

Copyright information:

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Universal : Public Domain Dedication License (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/).

Creative Commons License

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