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Author Notes:

DEBOLEENA ROY is associate professor and chair of the Department of Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and holds a joint appointment in the Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Program at Emory University.

Publication of this open monograph was the result of Emory University’s participation in TOME (Toward an Open Monograph Ecosystem), a collaboration of the Association of American Universities, the Association of University Presses, and the Association of Research Libraries.

TOME aims to expand the reach of long-form humanities and social science scholarship including digital scholarship.

Additionally, the program looks to ensure the sustainability of university press monograph publishing by supporting the highest quality scholarship and promoting a new ecology of scholarly publishing in which authors’ institutions bear the publication costs.

Open access edition: DOI 10.6069/j163-3c90

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Research Funding:

The open access edition of Molecular Feminisms is available thanks to a TOME grant from Emory University, with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Keywords:

  • biology
  • feminism
  • philosophy
  • Deleuze
  • postcolonial studies

Molecular Feminisms: Biology, Becomings, and Life in the Lab

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Book | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

"Should feminists clone?" "What do neurons think about?" "How can we learn from bacterial writing?" These and other provocative questions have long preoccupied neuroscientist, molecular biologist, and intrepid feminist theorist Deboleena Roy, who takes seriously the capabilities of lab "objects"-bacteria and other human, nonhuman, organic, and inorganic actants-in order to understand processes of becoming. In Molecular Feminisms, Roy investigates science as feminism at the lab bench, engaging in an interdisciplinary conversation between molecular biology, Deleuzian philosophies, posthumanism, and postcolonial and decolonial studies. She brings insights from feminist theory together with lessons learned from bacteria, subcloning, and synthetic biology, arguing that renewed interest in matter and materiality must be accompanied by a feminist rethinking of scientific research methods and techniques.

Copyright information:

© 2018 by Deboleena Roy

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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