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Author Notes:

Ashish J. Mehta, M.D., is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, and a Staff Physician at the Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia.

David M. Guidot, M.D., is a Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, and a Staff Physician at the Atlanta VA Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia.

The authors declare that they have no competing financial interests.

Subject:

Research Funding:

Dr. Mehta is supported by a Career Development Award (1IK2CX000643) from the Clinical Science Research and Development Service of the Veterans Affairs Office of Research and Development. Dr. Guidot is supported by grants from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R01–AA–017627) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (R01–HL–125042).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Substance Abuse
  • Alcohol consumption
  • alcohol use disorder
  • alcoholic lung
  • lung
  • lung disease
  • lung injury
  • respiratory system
  • pulmonary system
  • alveolar macrophage
  • antioxidant
  • ACUTE RESPIRATORY-DISTRESS
  • COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA
  • EPITHELIAL BARRIER FUNCTION
  • CHRONIC ETHANOL INGESTION
  • MULTIPLE ORGAN DYSFUNCTION
  • ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGE
  • FED RATS
  • OXIDATIVE STRESS
  • TIGHT JUNCTIONS
  • GLUTATHIONE HOMEOSTASIS

Alcohol and the Lung

Tools:

Journal Title:

Alcohol Research Current Reviews

Volume:

Volume 38, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 243-254

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Among the many organ systems affected by harmful alcohol use, the lungs are particularly susceptible to infections and injury. The mechanisms responsible for rendering people with alcohol use disorder (AUD) vulnerable to lung damage include alterations in host defenses of the upper and lower airways, disruption of alveolar epithelial barrier integrity, and alveolar macrophage immune dysfunction. Collectively, these derangements encompass what has been termed the "alcoholic lung" phenotype. Alcohol-related reductions in antioxidant levels also may contribute to lung disease in people with underlying AUD. In addition, researchers have identified several regulatory molecules that may play crucial roles in the alcohol-induced disease processes. Although there currently are no approved therapies to combat the detrimental effects of chronic alcohol consumption on the respiratory system, these molecules may be potential therapeutic targets to guide future investigation.

Copyright information:

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Universal : Public Domain Dedication License (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/).

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