About this item:

149 Views | 107 Downloads

Author Notes:

melissa.young@emory.edu

Conceptualization: Melissa F. Young, Phuong Hong Nguyen, Ines Gonzalez Casanova, O. Yaw Addo, Reynaldo Martorell, Usha Ramakrishnan.

Data curation: Melissa F. Young, Phuong Hong Nguyen.

Formal analysis: Melissa F. Young, Phuong Hong Nguyen, Ines Gonzalez Casanova, O. Yaw Addo.

Investigation: Ines Gonzalez Casanova, Lan Mai Tran, Son Nguyen.

Methodology: Melissa F. Young, Phuong Hong Nguyen, O. Yaw Addo, Lan Mai Tran, Son Nguyen.

Supervision: Melissa F. Young, Phuong Hong Nguyen, Usha Ramakrishnan.

Writing – original draft: Melissa F. Young, Phuong Hong Nguyen.

Writing – review & editing: Reynaldo Martorell, Usha Ramakrishnan.

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Funding for this research was provided by the Thrasher Research Fund (https://www.thrasherresearch.org/default.aspx), Nestle Foundation (http://www.nestlefoundation.org/e/), Micronutrient Initiative (https://mathileinstitute.org) and the Mathile Institute for Advancement of Human Nutrition (https://mathileinstitute.org). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • MIDDLE-INCOME COUNTRIES
  • FOR-GESTATIONAL-AGE
  • CHILD GROWTH
  • BIRTH OUTCOMES
  • UNDERNUTRITION
  • UNDERWEIGHT
  • PREGNANCY
  • PATTERNS
  • INFANT

Role of maternal preconception nutrition on offspring growth and risk of stunting across the first 1000 days in Vietnam: A prospective cohort study

Tools:

Journal Title:

PLoS ONE

Volume:

Volume 13, Number 8

Publisher:

, Pages e0203201-e0203201

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Growing evidence supports the role of preconception maternal nutritional status (PMNS) on birth outcomes; however, evidence of relationships with child growth are limited. We examined associations between PMNS (height, weight and body mass index- BMI) and offspring growth during the first 1000 days. We used prospective cohort data from a randomized-controlled trial of preconception micronutrient supplementation in Vietnam, PRECONCEPT (n = 1409). Poisson regression models were used to examine associations between PMNS and risk of offspring stunting (<-2 HAZ) at 2 years. We used path analytic models to examine associations with PMNS on fetal growth (ultrasound measurements) and offspring HAZ at birth and 2 years. All models were adjusted for child age, sex, gestational weight gain, education, socioeconomic status and treatment group. A third of women had a preconception height < 150cm or weight < 43 kg. Women with preconception height < 150 cm or a weight < 43 kg were at increased risk of having a stunted child at 2 years (incident risk ratio IRR: 1.85, 95% CI 1.51–2.28; IRR 1.35, 95% CI 1.10–1.65, respectively). While the traditional low BMI cut-off (< 18.5 kg/m2) was not significant, lower BMI cut-offs (< 17.5 kg/m2or < 18.0 kg/m2) were significantly associated with 1.3 times increased risk of child stunting. In path models, PMNS were positively associated with fetal growth (ultrasound measurements) and offspring HAZ at birth and 2 years. For each 1 standard deviation (SD) increase in maternal height and weight, offspring HAZ at 2 years increased by 0.30 SD and 0.23 SD, respectively. In conclusion, PMNS influences both offspring linear growth and risk of stunting across the first 1000 days. These findings underscore the importance of expanding the scope of current policies and strategies to include the preconception period in order to reduce child stunting.

Copyright information:

© 2018 Young et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Export to EndNote