About this item:

287 Views | 379 Downloads

Author Notes:

Murray A. Rudd murrayrudd@gmail.com

We thank steering committee members Jewell Harper of Second Nature and Stephen O’Day of Smith, Gambrell & Russell Law, and workshop participants John A. Lanier of the Anderson Foundation and Katie Ottenweller of the Southern Environmental Law Center for intellectual contributions to the project.

We would especially like to thank the individuals and organizations who contributed candidate research questions to this exercise.

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

We thank Emory University for providing funding to MAR to support a postdoctoral researcher for this research.

We thank the GCP founding partners Georgia Institute of Technology, Emory University, and University of Georgia for providing financial and logistical support for the workshop.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Environmental Sciences
  • Environmental Sciences & Ecology
  • Adaptation
  • Climate change
  • Horizon scanning
  • Mitigation
  • Research priorities
  • SEA-LEVEL RISE
  • GREENHOUSE-GAS EMISSIONS
  • PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS
  • UNITED-STATES
  • SOCIAL VULNERABILITY
  • GLOBAL CHANGE
  • CARBON SEQUESTRATION
  • MANAGEMENT POLICY
  • MARINE ECOSYSTEMS
  • CHANGE IMPACTS

Climate research priorities for policy-makers, practitioners, and scientists in Georgia, USA

Show all authors Show less authors

Tools:

Journal Title:

Environmental Management

Volume:

Volume 62, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 190-209

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Climate change has far-reaching effects on human and ecological systems, requiring collaboration across sectors and disciplines to determine effective responses. To inform regional responses to climate change, decision-makers need credible and relevant information representing a wide swath of knowledge and perspectives. The southeastern U. S. State of Georgia is a valuable focal area for study because it contains multiple ecological zones that vary greatly in land use and economic activities, and it is vulnerable to diverse climate change impacts. We identified 40 important research questions that, if answered, could lay the groundwork for effective, science-based climate action in Georgia. Top research priorities were identified through a broad solicitation of candidate research questions (180 were received). A group of experts across sectors and disciplines gathered for a workshop to categorize, prioritize, and filter the candidate questions, identify missing topics, and rewrite questions. Participants then collectively chose the 40 most important questions. This cross-sectoral effort ensured the inclusion of a diversity of topics and questions (e.g., coastal hazards, agricultural production, ecosystem functioning, urban infrastructure, and human health) likely to be important to Georgia policy-makers, practitioners, and scientists. Several cross-cutting themes emerged, including the need for long-term data collection and consideration of at-risk Georgia citizens and communities. Workshop participants defined effective responses as those that take economic cost, environmental impacts, and social justice into consideration. Our research highlights the importance of collaborators across disciplines and sectors, and discussing challenges and opportunities that will require transdisciplinary solutions.

Copyright information:

© The Author(s) 2018

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
Export to EndNote