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Author Notes:

Correspondence: Jianyi (Jay) Zhang, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine, of Engineering, School of Medicine, School of Engineering, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama 35294, Telephone: (205) 934-8421, Fax: 3179372632, jayzhang@uab.edu.

Acknowledgments: The authors gratefully acknowledge NIH support of their research, and the Symposium held at University of Alabama-Birmingham in March 2016.

Disclosures: This work was a product of discussions at the NIH Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering Symposium, March 2016.

Garry: Boston Scientific, NorthStar Genomics; Hare: Vestion, Longeveron LLC; All other authors had nothing to disclose.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

NIH Progenitor Cell Biology Consortium (grant HL099997)

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
  • Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
  • biocompatible materials
  • heart failure
  • myocardial infarction
  • myocardium
  • stem cells
  • PLURIPOTENT STEM-CELLS
  • CARDIOVASCULAR PROGENITOR CELLS
  • SINGLE-VENTRICLE PHYSIOLOGY
  • CARDIOSPHERE-DERIVED CELLS
  • LEFT-HEART SYNDROME
  • FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES
  • IN-VIVO
  • MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
  • CARDIOMYOCYTE DIFFERENTIATION
  • BLASTOCYST COMPLEMENTATION

Overcoming the Roadblocks to Cardiac Cell Therapy Using Tissue Engineering

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Journal Title:

Journal of the American College of Cardiology

Volume:

Volume 70, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 766-775

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Transplantations of various stem cells or their progeny have repeatedly improved cardiac performance in animal models of myocardial injury; however, the benefits observed in clinical trials have been generally less consistent. Some of the recognized challenges are poor engraftment of implanted cells and, in the case of human cardiomyocytes, functional immaturity and lack of electrical integration, leading to limited contribution to the heart's contractile activity and increased arrhythmogenic risks. Advances in tissue and genetic engineering techniques are expected to improve the survival and integration of transplanted cells, and to support structural, functional, and bioenergetic recovery of the recipient hearts. Specifically, application of a prefabricated cardiac tissue patch to prevent dilation and to improve pumping efficiency of the infarcted heart offers a promising strategy for making stem cell therapy a clinical reality.

Copyright information:

© 2017 The Authors

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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