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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Lisa Nobel, M.S.c, University of Massachusetts Medical School, 368 Plantation Street, The Albert Sherman Center, Worcester, MA 01605, Phone: (508) 856-8999, Fax: (508) 856-8993, lisa.nobel@umassmed.edu

Disclosure of Interest: The authors have no financial conflicts of interest with respect to this study to report.

The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Subject:

Research Funding:

Funds to conduct this study were obtained from several sources.

Analyses were primarily funded through an NIDDK grant (1R21DK081887, DW Roblin, PI).

Data collection was funded through this NIDDK grant and a CDC grant (1R01CD000033, ER Becker, PI).

Research reported in this publication was also supported by the National Institute of Minority Health And Health Disparities of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number P60MD006912.

Support for Ms. Nobel was obtained from NHLBI grant numbers 1T32HL120823-01 as a trainee on a T32 grant and as a F30 fellow from F30 HL 128012.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Biotechnology & Applied Microbiology
  • Toxicology
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • renal disease
  • CUMULATIVE BIOLOGICAL RISK
  • NORTHERN SWEDISH COHORT
  • PHYSIOLOGICAL DYSREGULATION
  • METABOLIC SYNDROME
  • SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
  • OLDER POPULATION
  • CARDIOVASCULAR RISK
  • UNITED-STATES
  • US ADULTS
  • MACARTHUR

Index of cardiometabolic health: a new method of measuring allostatic load using electronic health records

Tools:

Journal Title:

Biomarkers

Volume:

Volume 22, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 394-402

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Objective: We developed a measure of allostatic load from electronic medical records (EMRs), which we named “Index of Cardiometabolic Health” (ICMH). Methods: Data were collected from participants’ EMRs and a written survey in 2005. We computed allostatic load scores using the ICMH score and two previously described approaches. Results: We included 1865 employed adults who were 25–59 years old. Although the magnitude of the association was small, all methods of were predictive of SF-12 physical component subscales (all p < 0.001). Conclusion: We found that the ICMH had similar relationships with health-related quality of life as previously reported in the literature.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

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