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Author Notes:

Correspondence: trond.aasen@vhir.org (T.A.); srj6n@virginia.edu (S.J.); mhkoval@emory.edu (M.K.); Tel.: +34-93489-4168 (T.A.)

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

The funding sponsors had no role in the design of the study; in the collection, analyses, or interpretation of data; in the writing of the manuscript, and in the decision to publish the results.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Trond Aasen acknowledges support from Instituto de Salud Carlos III grants PI13/00763, PI16/00772 and CPII16/00042, co-financed by the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF).

Supported by NIH R01-AA025854 and R01-HL137112 (Michael Koval) and F31-HL139109 (K. Sabrina Lynn).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Physical Sciences
  • Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
  • Chemistry, Multidisciplinary
  • Chemistry
  • connexins
  • gap junctions
  • transcription
  • translation
  • post-translational modifications
  • trafficking
  • GAP-JUNCTION PROTEIN
  • CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN
  • MARIE-TOOTH-DISEASE
  • HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITOR
  • CHEMICAL-SHIFT ASSIGNMENTS
  • CATARACT-ASSOCIATED MUTANT
  • IRES-MEDIATED TRANSLATION
  • MUSCLE-CELL PROLIFERATION
  • HUMAN GLIOBLASTOMA CELLS
  • LIVER EPITHELIAL-CELLS

Connexins: Synthesis, Post-Translational Modifications, and Trafficking in Health and Disease

Tools:

Journal Title:

International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Volume:

Volume 19, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 1296-1296

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Connexins are tetraspan transmembrane proteins that form gap junctions and facilitate direct intercellular communication, a critical feature for the development, function, and homeostasis of tissues and organs. In addition, a growing number of gap junction-independent functions are being ascribed to these proteins. The connexin gene family is under extensive regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, and undergoes numerous modifications at the protein level, including phosphorylation, which ultimately affects their trafficking, stability, and function. Here, we summarize these key regulatory events, with emphasis on how these affect connexin multifunctionality in health and disease.

Copyright information:

© 2018 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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