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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Rachel E. Patzer, PhD, MPH, Department of Surgery, Division of Transplantation, 101 Woodruff Circle, 5101 Woodruff Memorial Research Building, Atlanta, GA 30322, rpatzer@emory.edu, Phone: (404)-727-6047

The content is the responsibility of the authors alone and does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.”

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported in part by Health Resources and Services Administration contract 234-2005-370011C.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Health Care Sciences & Services
  • Health Policy & Services
  • STAGE RENAL-DISEASE
  • UNITED-STATES
  • SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
  • RACIAL DISPARITIES
  • ACCESS
  • OUTCOMES
  • RACE
  • POVERTY
  • POLICY
  • CANDIDATES

New Kidney Allocation System Associated With Increased Rates Of Transplants Among Black And Hispanic Patients

Tools:

Journal Title:

Health Affairs

Volume:

Volume 36, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 1078-1085

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Before the 2014 implementation of a new kidney allocation system by the United Network for Organ Sharing, white patients were more likely than black or Hispanic patients to receive a kidney transplant. To determine the effect of the new allocation system on these disparities, we examined data for 179,071 transplant waiting list events in the period June 2013-September 2016, and we calculated monthly transplantation rates (34,133 patients actually received transplants). Implementation of the new system was associated with a narrowing of the disparities in the average monthly transplantation rates by 0.29 percentage point for blacks compared to whites and by 0.24 percentage point for Hispanics compared to whites, which resulted in both disparities becoming nonsignificant after implementation of the new system.

Copyright information:

© 2017 Project HOPE-The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

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