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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Pamela T. Bhatti, Assistant Professor, Department of Bioengineering, and Microelectronics/Microsystems, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, USA, Tel: 404.385.3144; Email: pamela.bhatti@ece.gatech.edu.

The authors thank Wanchao Gao, Andrew Durand and James Steinberg from the School of Electrical and Computer and Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology for hardware development, as well as Diana Fouts for graphical support.

The authors also thank Charles Bering, AuD and Lisa Heusel-Gillig, DPT from the Emory Dizziness and Balance Center for testing assistance.

The results of the first pilot study were briefly reported at the IEEE-AMA Conference in Boston, MA on Oct. 11, 2011.

Informed consent was obtained in compliance with institutional review board protocol of Emory University, Atlanta, GA.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

P. Bhatti was supported in part by PHS Grant KL2 RR025009 from the Clinical and Translational Science Award program, National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources.

This work was supported in part by National Science Foundation BRIGE Award 0927103 and by PHS Grant KL2 RR025009 from the Clinical and Translational Science Award program, National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources.

Keywords:

  • Gaze stabilization
  • Inertial sensors
  • Vestibular hypofunction
  • Vestibular rehabilitation

A Prototype Head-Motion Monitoring System for In-Home Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Bioengineering and Biomedical Science

Volume:

Volume Suppl 1

Publisher:

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

This work reports the use of a head-motion monitoring system to record patient head movements while completing in-home exercises for vestibular rehabilitation therapy. Based upon a dual-axis gyroscope (yaw and pitch, ± 500-degrees/sec maximum), angular head rotations were measured and stored via an on-board memory card. The system enabled the clinician to document exercises at home. Several measurements were recorded in one patient with unilateral vestibular hypofunction: The total time of exercise for the week (118 minutes) was documented and compared with expected weekly exercise time (140 minutes). For gaze stabilization exercises, execution time of 60 sec was expected, and observed times ranged from 75-100 sec. An absence of rest periods between each exercise instead of the recommended one minute rest period was observed. Maximum yaw head velocities from approximately 100-350 degrees/sec were detected. A second subject provided feedback concerning the ease of use of the HAMMS device. This pilot study demonstrates, for the first time, the capability to capture the head-motion "signature" of a patient while completing vestibular rehabilitation exercises in the home and to extract exercise regime parameters and monitor patient adherence. This emerging technology has the potential to greatly improve rehabilitation outcomes for individuals completing in-home gaze stabilization exercises.

Copyright information:

© 2012 Bhatti PT, et al.

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