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Author Notes:

E-mail: kmwall@emory.edu

Conceived and designed the experiments: EK FK JT CMV MGK SAA.

Performed the experiments: FK MC JT SMD CMV MGK.

Analyzed the data: ALK EK PSS FK EC KMW.

Wrote the paper: ALK EK PSS FK EC MC JT SMD CMV MGK KMW SAA.

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

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Research Funding:

This work was supported by funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Grant No. R01 MH66767, Fogarty AIDS International Training and Research Program (AITRP) FIC 2D43 TW001042, the Emory Center for AIDS Research (CFAR) P30 AI050409, and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative.

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Knowledge and Perceptions of Couples' Voluntary Counseling and Testing in Urban Rwanda and Zambia: A Cross-Sectional Household Survey

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Journal Title:

PLoS ONE

Volume:

Volume 6, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages e19573-e19573

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Background Most incident HIV infections in sub-Saharan Africa occur between cohabiting, discordant, heterosexual couples. Though couples' voluntary HIV counseling and testing (CVCT) is an effective, well-studied intervention in Africa, <1% of couples have been jointly tested. Methods We conducted cross-sectional household surveys in Kigali, Rwanda (n = 600) and Lusaka, Zambia (n = 603) to ascertain knowledge, perceptions, and barriers to use of CVCT. Results Compared to Lusaka, Kigali respondents were significantly more aware of HIV testing sites (79% vs. 56%); had greater knowledge of HIV serodiscordance between couples (83% vs. 43%); believed CVCT is good (96% vs. 72%); and were willing to test jointly (91% vs. 47%). Stigma, fear of partner reaction, and distance/cost/logistics were CVCT barriers. Conclusions Though most respondents had positive attitudes toward CVCT, the majority were unaware that serodiscordance between cohabiting couples is possible. Future messages should target gaps in knowledge about serodiscordance, provide logistical information about CVCT services, and aim to reduce stigma and fear.

Copyright information:

© Kelley et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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