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Author Notes:

Gianluca Tosini, Department of Pharmacology and Neuroscience Institute, Morehouse School of Medicine, 720 Westview Dr, Atlanta, GA 30310, USA Email: gtosini@msm.edu.

PMI is a recipient of Senior Scientific Investigator Award from RPB.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Research in the authors’ laboratories is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health [R01 NS43459, R21 EY028821, R01 EY022216 (G.T.); R01 CA127119, R01 NS43459 (K.Y.); R01 EY004864, P30 EY006360 (PMI)], and Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc. (RPB) (PMI).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • N-acetylserotonin
  • melatonin
  • TrK B
  • sleep
  • neuroprotection
  • circadian rhythms
  • photoreceptors
  • RAT SUPRACHIASMATIC NUCLEUS
  • HIPPOCAMPAL NEUROGENESIS
  • ACETYLTRANSFERASE ACTIVITY
  • NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR
  • MELATONIN SYNTHESIS
  • ADULT NEUROGENESIS
  • CELL-PROLIFERATION
  • DENTATE GYRUS
  • PROTEASOMAL PROTEOLYSIS
  • SUPPRESSES NEUROGENESIS

N-Acetylserotonin: Neuroprotection, Neurogenesis, and the Sleepy Brain

Tools:

Journal Title:

Neuroscientist

Volume:

Volume 18, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 645-653

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

N-Acetylserotonin (NAS) is a naturally occurring chemical intermediate in biosynthesis of melatonin. Previous studies have shown that NAS has different brain distribution patterns from those of serotonin and melatonin, suggesting that NAS might have functions other than as a precursor or metabolite of melatonin. Indeed, several studies have now shown that NAS may play an important role in mood regulation and may have antidepressant activity. Additional studies have shown that NAS stimulates proliferation of neuroprogenitor cells and prevents some of the negative effects of sleep deprivation. It is believed that the antidepressant and neurotrophic actions of NAS are due at least in part to the capability on this molecule to activate the TrkB receptor in a brain-derived neurotrophic factor-independent manner. Emerging evidence also indicates that NAS and its derivatives have neuroprotective properties and protect retinal photoreceptor cells from light-induced degeneration. In this review, the authors discuss the literature about this exciting and underappreciated molecule.

Copyright information:

© The Author(s) 2012.

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