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Author Notes:

G.N. Neigh, Department of Anatomy & Neurobiology, Virginia Commonwealth University, PO Box 980709, Richmond, VA 23298, USA, Email: gretchen.mccandless@vcuhealth.org.

All animal care and tissue collection was conducted by SW and CAS at Wake Forest University.

GNN and CAS conceived the hypothesis tested herein.

GNN designed the histological plan with assistance from DG.

SDK and LM stained the tissue.

AK, KS, and LM collected the stereologic endpoints.

AK analyzed the data under the supervision of GNN.

AK and GNN wrote the manuscript together.

All authors reviewed and approved the submitted manuscript.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by R21MH086731 (to CAS) and institutional fund from Emory University Department of Physiology (to GNN).

BP-ENDURE initiative R25GM097636 (to AK and KS).

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Psychology, Biological
  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Psychology
  • Vascular
  • Depression
  • Female
  • Cerebrovasculature
  • Macaca fascicularis
  • Unbiased stereology
  • Hippocampus
  • BODY-MASS INDEX
  • CYNOMOLGUS MONKEYS
  • STRESS-RESPONSE
  • SEX-DIFFERENCES
  • MOOD DISORDERS
  • SOCIAL STRESS
  • UNITED-STATES
  • BEHAVIOR
  • ANXIETY
  • ASSOCIATIONS

Reduced Marker of Vascularization in the Anterior Hippocampus in a Female Monkey Model of Depression

Tools:

Journal Title:

Physiology and Behavior

Volume:

Volume 172

Publisher:

, Pages 12-15

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Depression is a common and debilitating mood disorder that impacts women more often than men. The mechanisms that result in depressive behaviors are not fully understood; however, the hippocampus has been noted as a key structure in the pathophysiology of depression. In addition to neural implications of depression, the cardiovascular system is impacted. Although not as commonly considered, the cerebrovasculature is critical to brain function, impacted by environmental stimuli, and is capable of altering neural function and thereby behavior. In the current study, we assessed the relationship between depressive behavior and a marker of vascularization of the hippocampus in adult female cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis). Similar to previously noted impacts on neuropil and glia, the depressed phenotype predicts a reduction in a marker of vascular length in the anterior hippocampus. These data reinforce the growing recognition of the effects of depression on vasculature and support further consideration of vascular endpoints in studies aimed at the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying depression.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Elsevier Inc.

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