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Author Notes:

Vikram G. Shakkottai: vikramsh@med.umich.edu

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

VGS was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (K08NS072158, R01NS085054).

EJH was supported in part by Public Health Service grant R01 NS088528 and a grant from the United States Department of Defense (PR140091).

MSL was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01 NS069936, R01 NS082296, and Dystonia Coalition U54 NS065701), the Dorothy/Daniel Gerwin Parkinson’s Research Fund, and the Benign Essential Blepharospasm Research Foundation.

HAJ was supported in part by a grant to the Dystonia Coalition (U54 NS065701, TR001456) from the Office of Rare Diseases at the National Center for Advancing Translational Studies and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the NIH.

MH was supported by the NIH intramural program.

PLS was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health (R01 NS24328, P30 NS076405, P40 OD010996).

KK was supported by NIH grants NS050808 and NS079750.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Cerebellum
  • Dystonia
  • Ataxia
  • DYT1
  • Networks
  • Circuits
  • THETA BURST STIMULATION
  • PURKINJE-CELL ACTIVITY
  • FOCAL HAND DYSTONIA
  • KNOCK-IN MOUSE
  • BENIGN ESSENTIAL BLEPHAROSPASM
  • DOPA-RESPONSIVE DYSTONIA
  • PRIMARY TORSION DYSTONIA
  • MOTOR CORTEX PLASTICITY
  • DEEP BRAIN-STIMULATION
  • EPISODIC ATAXIA TYPE-2

Current Opinions and Areas of Consensus on the Role of the Cerebellum in Dystonia

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Journal Title:

Cerebellum

Volume:

Volume 16, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 577-594

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

A role for the cerebellum in causing ataxia, a disorder characterized by uncoordinated movement, is widely accepted. Recent work has suggested that alterations in activity, connectivity, and structure of the cerebellum are also associated with dystonia, a neurological disorder characterized by abnormal and sustained muscle contractions often leading to abnormal maintained postures. In this manuscript, the authors discuss their views on how the cerebellum may play a role in dystonia. The following topics are discussed:The relationships between neuronal/network dysfunctions and motor abnormalities in rodent models of dystonia.Data about brain structure, cerebellar metabolism, cerebellar connections, and noninvasive cerebellar stimulation that support (or not) a role for the cerebellum in human dystonia.Connections between the cerebellum and motor cortical and sub-cortical structures that could support a role for the cerebellum in dystonia. Overall points of consensus include:Neuronal dysfunction originating in the cerebellum can drive dystonic movements in rodent model systems.Imaging and neurophysiological studies in humans suggest that the cerebellum plays a role in the pathophysiology of dystonia, but do not provide conclusive evidence that the cerebellum is the primary or sole neuroanatomical site of origin.

Copyright information:

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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