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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Jacqueline A. Palmer, 1441 Clifton Rd, Atlanta, GA, USA. Tel.: +1 404 712 0612; Fax: +1 404 712 4130; E-mail: Jacqueline.a.palmer@emory.edu.

The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Conflicts of interest: None.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Research reported in this publication was supported by the American Heart Association [AHA00035638] and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute Of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number K12HD055931.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation
  • paired associative stimulation
  • motor learning
  • HUMAN MOTOR CORTEX
  • FUNCTIONAL ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION
  • PERIPHERAL-NERVE STIMULATION
  • MAGNETIC STIMULATION
  • CORTICAL PLASTICITY
  • EPILEPTIC SEIZURES
  • EVOKED-POTENTIALS
  • RECOVERY
  • REHABILITATION
  • INDUCTION

Paired associative stimulation modulates corticomotor excitability in chronic stroke: A preliminary investigation

Tools:

Journal Title:

Restorative Neurology and Neuroscience

Volume:

Volume 36, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 183-194

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Paired associative stimulation (PAS) combining repeated pairing of electrical stimulation of a peripheral nerve with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the primary motor cortex (M1) can induce neuroplastic adaptations in the human brain and enhance motor learning in neurologically-intact individuals. However, the extent to which PAS is an effective technique for inducing associative plasticity and improving motor function in individuals post-stroke is unclear. Objective: The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of a single session of PAS to modulate corticomotor excitability and motor skill performance in individuals post-stroke. Methods: Seven individuals with chronic stroke completed two separate visits separated by at least one week. We assessed general corticomotor excitability, intracortical network activity and behavioral outcomes prior to and at three time points following PAS and compared these outcomes to those following a sham PAS condition (PAS SHAM). Results: Following PAS, we found increased general corticomotor excitability but no significant difference in behavioral measures between PAS conditions. There was a relationship between PAS-induced corticomotor excitability increase and enhanced motor skill performance across post-PAS testing time points. Conclusion: These results provide preliminary evidence for the potential of PAS to increase corticomotor excitability that could favorably impact motor skill performance in chronic individuals post-stroke and are an important first step for future studies investigating the clinical application and behavioral relevance of PAS interventions in post stroke patient populations.

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© 2018 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/).

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