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Author Notes:

Corresponding author at: Division of Physical Therapy, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, 1441 Clifton Road NE, R228, Atlanta, GA, 30322 USA. michael.borich@emory.edu

We would like to thank James Chen, Collette Wade, Jennifer Walters, and additional lab members for assistance with data collection.

Subject:

Research Funding:

MRB is supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development [grant number K12HD055931] and was supported by the National Institutes of Health [grant number 5R24HD050821-11].

WAG was supported by a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke [grant number 1U10NS086607].

TMK is supported by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development [grant number K01 HD079584].

MJS is supported by the National Institutes of Health [grant number HD083727-01A] and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society [PP2321].

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • TMS
  • H-reflex
  • Reliability
  • Corticospinal excitability
  • TMS-conditioning
  • Facilitation
  • TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION
  • BRAIN-STIMULATION
  • HARNESSING NEUROPLASTICITY
  • CLINICAL-APPLICATIONS
  • SPINAL EXCITABILITY
  • CONTRACTION
  • MOTONEURONS
  • INHIBITION
  • MODULATION
  • HUMANS

Establishing between-session reliability of TMS-conditioned soleus H-reflexes

Tools:

Journal Title:

Neuroscience Letters

Volume:

Volume 640

Publisher:

, Pages 47-52

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the primary motor cortex (M1) can be used to evaluate descending corticomotor influences on spinal reflex excitability through modulation of the Hoffman reflex (H-reflex). The purpose of this study was to characterize between-session reliability of cortical, spinal, and cortical-conditioned spinal excitability measures collected from the soleus muscle. Thirteen able-bodied young adult participants were tested over four sessions. Intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify between-session reliability of active motor threshold (AMT), unconditioned H-reflexes (expressed as a percentage of Mmax), and conditioned H-reflexes using short-latency facilitation (SLF) and long-latency facilitation (LLF). Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to assess associations between H-reflex facilitation and unconditioned H-reflex amplitude. Between-session reliability for SLF (ICC=0.71) was higher than for LLF (ICC=0.45), was excellent for AMT (ICC=0.95), and was moderate for unconditioned H-reflexes (ICC=0.63). Our results suggest moderate-to-good reliability of SLF and LLF to evaluate cortical influences on spinal reflex excitability across multiple testing sessions in able-bodied individuals.

Copyright information:

© 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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