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Author Notes:

Correspondence/Reprints: Dexter R. Voisin, Ph.D., School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago, 969 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: 773-702-1124/FAX: 773-702-0874/ d-voisin@uchicago.edu

Subject:

Research Funding:

This research was supported, in part, by the Emory Center for AIDS Research (NIH/NIAID 2 P30 AI50409-04A1), the Rural Center for AIDS/STD Prevention at Indiana University, a grant from the University Research Council at Emory University, and by a grant award to the Center for AIDS Prevention Studies R25 HD045810-02.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
  • ethnic identity
  • African American females
  • detainees
  • STIs
  • SEXUALLY-TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS
  • RACIAL IDENTITY
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS
  • NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE
  • DISCRIMINATION
  • TRACHOMATIS
  • ADJUSTMENT
  • SPECIMENS
  • BEHAVIORS
  • SCHOOL

The relationship between ethnic identity and Chlamydia and Gonorrhea infections among low-income detained African American adolescent females

Tools:

Journal Title:

Psychology, Health and Medicine

Volume:

Volume 18, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 355-362

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

This study explored the relationship between ethnic identity and Chlamydia and Gonorrhea infections among detained African American female adolescents. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 123 African American female adolescents within eight detention facilities in Georgia. Using audio-computer assisted self-interviewing technology, data were collected on demographics, ethnic identity, laboratory-confirmed Chlamydia and Gonorrhea, and other known correlates for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), such as socioeconomic status, parental monitoring, and risky sexual behaviors. Rates of Chlamydia and Gonorrhea testing yielded incidence rates of 22.6% and 4.3%, respectively. Findings indicated that, controlling for STI correlates, participants who indicated high ethnic identity were 4.3 times more likely to test positive for an STI compared to those scoring low on the measure of ethnic identity.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Taylor & Francis.

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