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Author Notes:

E-mail: larry.anderson@emory.edu

Conceived and designed the experiments: LJA DR.

Performed the experiments: DR KAG.

Analyzed the data: DR CEM.

Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: LJA DDE.

Wrote the paper: LJA DR.

We thank Theda Gibson and Katie Casper for technical assistance.

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported in part by funding provided by Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and the work partly supported by the immunology core of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta.

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • ASTHMA EXACERBATIONS
  • MONOCYTIC CELLS
  • RECEPTOR
  • CHILDREN
  • RELEASE
  • REPLICATION
  • EXPRESSION
  • SEROTYPES
  • CYTOKINES
  • ALPHA

Response to Rhinovirus Infection by Human Airway Epithelial Cells and Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in an In Vitro Two-Chamber Tissue Culture System

Tools:

Journal Title:

PLoS ONE

Volume:

Volume 8, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages e66600-e66600

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Human rhinovirus (HRV) infections are associated with the common cold, occasionally with more serious lower respiratory tract illnesses, and frequently with asthma exacerbations. The clinical features of HRV infection and its association with asthma exacerbation suggest that some HRV disease results from virus-induced host immune responses to infection. To study the HRV-infection-induced host responses and the contribution of these responses to disease, we have developed an in vitro model of HRV infection of human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cells) and subsequent exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to these infected cells in a two-chamber trans-well tissue culture system. Using this model, we studied HRV 14 (species B) and HRV 16 (species A) induced cytokine and chemokine responses with PBMCs from four healthy adults. Infection of Calu-3 cells with either virus induced HRV-associated increases in FGF-Basic, IL-15, IL-6, IL-28A, ENA-78 and IP-10. The addition of PBMCs to HRV 14-infected cells gave significant increases in MIP-1β, IL-28A, MCP-2, and IFN-α as compared with mock-infected cells. Interestingly, ENA-78 levels were reduced in HRV 14 infected cells that were exposed to PBMCs. Addition of PBMCs to HRV 16-infected cells did not induce MIP-1β, IL-28A and IFN-α efficiently nor did it decrease ENA-78 levels. Our results demonstrate a clear difference between HRV 14 and HRV 16 and the source of PBMCs, in up or down regulation of several cytokines including those that are linked to airway inflammation. Such differences might be one of the reasons for variation in disease associated with different HRV species including variation in their link to asthma exacerbations as suggested by other studies. Further study of immune responses associated with different HRVs and PBMCs from different patient groups, and the mechanisms leading to these differences, should help characterize pathogenesis of HRV disease and generate novel approaches to its treatment.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Rajan et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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