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Author Notes:

Correspondence to: Ellis J. Neufeld, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children’s Hospital Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115. ellis.neufeld@childrens.harvard.edu

We would like to thank all the participants (patients, families and staff) for their contributions to this study.

This study was supported by grants from an anonymous donor to the Boston Center for Genetic and Acquired Blood Disease, by the Glaser Pediatric Research Network, and by Genentech/Biogen-Idec.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Grant sponsor: General Clinical Research Centers at the Baylor College of Medicine (GCRC); Grant sponsor: NIH; Grant number: M01RR000188; Grant sponsor: Children’s Hospital, Boston (GCRC); Grant sponsor: NIH; Grant number: M01RR002172; Grant sponsor: University of California, Los Angeles (GCRG); Grant sponsor: NIH; Grant number: M01RR000865; Grant sponsor: Weill Medical College at Cornell University; Grant sponsor: NIH; Grant number: M01-RR000047; Grant sponsor: Pediatric Clinical Research Center at the University of California, San Francisco; Grant sponsor: NIH; Grant number: M01RR-001271; Grant sponsor: Lita Annenberg Hazen Foundation, University of California, Los Angeles.

Additional support was provided by General Clinical Research Centers at the Baylor College of Medicine, (GCRC grant No. M01RR000188), Children’s Hospital, Boston (GCRC No. M01RR002172), the University of California, Los Angeles, (GCRG No. M01RR000865) and Weill Medical College at Cornell University (M01-RR000047) and the Pediatric Clinical Research Center at the University of California, San Francisco (Grant No M01-RR-001271).

Support was also provided by the Lita Annenberg Hazen Foundation, University of California, Los Angeles.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Oncology
  • Hematology
  • Pediatrics
  • clinical trial
  • immune thrombocytopenia
  • rituximab
  • ANTI-CD20 MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY
  • INTRAVENOUS GAMMA-GLOBULIN
  • CHILDHOOD
  • EFFICACY
  • ADULTS

One Year Follow-Up of Children and Adolescents With Chronic Immune Thrombocytopenic Purpura (ITP) Treated With Rituximab

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Journal Title:

Pediatric Blood and Cancer

Volume:

Volume 52, Number 2

Publisher:

, Pages 259-262

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background. We previously showed in a prospective study that rituximab appears to be effective in some children and adolescents with severe chronic immune thrombocytopenia. Eleven of 36 patients achieved and maintained platelet counts over 50,000/mm 3 within the first 12 weeks. These patients were followed for the next year. Methods. Platelet counts were monitored monthly and all subsequent bleeding manifestations and need for further treatment was noted. Results. Eight of the 11 initial responders maintained a platelet count over 150,000/mm 3 without further treatment intervention. Three patients had a late relapse. One initial non-responder achieved a remission after 16 weeks, and two additional patients maintained platelet counts around 50,000/mm 3 without the need for further intervention. Conclusions. Rituximab resulted in sustained efficacy with platelet counts of 50,000/mm 3 or higher in 11 of 36 patients (31%).

Copyright information:

© 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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