About this item:

187 Views | 116 Downloads

Author Notes:

Correspondence at present address: Richard A. Goodman, MD, Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, Emory University, 1841 Clifton Rd. NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (phone: 404/727-1513; rgood02@emory.edu

We thank Gloria Wheatcroft, MPH, for her assistance with data processing of the Medicare claims.

Work related to this manuscript by Drs. Goodman, Lochner, Thambisetty, Posner, and Ling was carried out in their official capacities as employees of the federal government and their respective HHS federal agencies.

To the best of our knowledge, no conflict of interest, financial or other, exists.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

No external funding source was used to complete the study.

Dr. Wingo's work is supported by grants from the Department of Veteran's Affairs and the National Institutes of Health.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dementia
  • Epidemiology
  • Medicare
  • Prevalence
  • Subtypes
  • IDENTIFYING ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • PUBLIC-HEALTH IMPACT
  • VASCULAR DEMENTIA
  • CLINICAL-CRITERIA
  • PRIMARY-CARE
  • LEWY BODIES
  • CLAIMS
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • ACCURACY
  • RECOMMENDATIONS

Prevalence of dementia subtypes in United States Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries, 2011-2013

Tools:

Journal Title:

Alzheimer's and Dementia

Volume:

Volume 13, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 28-37

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Introduction Rapid growth of the older adult population requires greater epidemiologic characterization of dementia. We developed national prevalence estimates of diagnosed dementia and subtypes in the highest risk United States (US) population. Methods We analyzed Centers for Medicare & Medicaid administrative enrollment and claims data for 100% of Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries enrolled during 2011–2013 and age ≥68 years as of December 31, 2013 (n = 21.6 million). Results Over 3.1 million (14.4%) beneficiaries had a claim for a service and/or treatment for any dementia subtype. Dementia not otherwise specified was the most common diagnosis (present in 92.9%). The most common subtype was Alzheimer's (43.5%), followed by vascular (14.5%), Lewy body (5.4%), frontotemporal (1.0%), and alcohol induced (0.7%). The prevalence of other types of diagnosed dementia was 0.2%. Discussion This study is the first to document concurrent prevalence of primary dementia subtypes among this US population. The findings can assist in prioritizing dementia research, clinical services, and caregiving resources.

Copyright information:

© 2016 the Alzheimer's Association

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote