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Author Notes:

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: dan.wechsler@duke.edu; Tel.: +1-919-684-3401; Fax: +1-919-681-7950.

The authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Nutrition & Dietetics
  • iron
  • chelation
  • cancer
  • leukemia
  • neuroblastoma
  • ribonucleotide reductase
  • PYRIDOXAL ISONICOTINOYL HYDRAZONE
  • CELL-CYCLE ARREST
  • MAMMALIAN RIBONUCLEOTIDE REDUCTASE
  • HYPOXIA-INDUCIBLE FACTOR-1-ALPHA
  • MYELOID-LEUKEMIA CELLS
  • C-MYC
  • TRANSFERRIN RECEPTOR
  • ANTITUMOR-ACTIVITY
  • IN-VITRO
  • POSTTRANSCRIPTIONAL REGULATION

Iron Deprivation in Cancer-Potential Therapeutic Implications

Tools:

Journal Title:

Nutrients

Volume:

Volume 5, Number 8

Publisher:

, Pages 2836-2859

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Iron is essential for normal cellular function. It participates in a wide variety of cellular processes, including cellular respiration, DNA synthesis, and macromolecule biosynthesis. Iron is required for cell growth and proliferation, and changes in intracellular iron availability can have significant effects on cell cycle regulation, cellular metabolism, and cell division. Perhaps not surprisingly then, neoplastic cells have been found to have higher iron requirements than normal, non-malignant cells. Iron depletion through chelation has been explored as a possible therapeutic intervention in a variety of cancers. Here, we will review iron homeostasis in non-malignant and malignant cells, the widespread effects of iron depletion on the cell, the various iron chelators that have been explored in the treatment of cancer, and the tumor types that have been most commonly studied in the context of iron chelation.

Copyright information:

© 2013 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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