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Author Notes:

Email: crflowe@emory.edu

The author(s) declare that they have no competing interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This publication was supported in part by award number R21 CA158686 to Dr. Flowers.

The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Oncology
  • Hematology
  • Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Epidemiology
  • Biology
  • NHL subtypes
  • NON-HODGKIN-LYMPHOMA
  • B-CELL LYMPHOMA
  • GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
  • CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA
  • HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION
  • CLASS SWITCH RECOMBINATION
  • FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA
  • POOLED ANALYSIS
  • UNITED-STATES
  • INTERLYMPH-CONSORTIUM

To Each Its Own: Linking the Biology and Epidemiology of NHL Subtypes

Tools:

Journal Title:

Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports

Volume:

Volume 10, Number 3

Publisher:

, Pages 244-255

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) constitutes a diverse group of more than 40 subtypes, each characterized by distinct biologic and clinical features. Until recently, pinpointing genetic and epidemiologic risk factors for individual subtypes has been limited by the relative rarity of each. However, several large pooled case-control studies have provided sufficient statistical power for detecting etiologic differences and commonalities between subtypes and thus yield new insight into their unique epidemiologic backgrounds. Here, we review the subtype-specific medical, lifestyle, and biologic components identified in these studies, which suggest that a complex interplay between host genetics, autoimmune disorders, modifiable risk factors, and occupation contributes to lymphomagenesis.

Copyright information:

© 2015, Springer Science+Business Media New York.

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