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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Rob Stephenson, Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, 400 North Ingalls, Room 2236, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA. Email: rbsteph@umich.edu

The author(s) declared no potential conflicts of interest with respect to the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article.

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Research Funding:

The author(s) disclosed receipt of the following financial support for the research, authorship, and/or publication of this article: The original research was supported by funding from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, Grant #5R21HD066306-02.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
  • intimate partner violence
  • MSM
  • minority stress
  • SAME-SEX RELATIONSHIPS
  • YOUNG MEN
  • INTERNALIZED HOMOPHOBIA
  • RELATIONSHIP QUALITY
  • SUBSTANCE USE
  • RISK
  • HEALTH
  • ABUSE
  • EXPERIENCES
  • COHORT

Minority Stress and Intimate Partner Violence Among Gay and Bisexual Men in Atlanta

Tools:

Journal Title:

American Journal of Men's Health

Volume:

Volume 11, Number 4

Publisher:

, Pages 952-961

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) rates are disproportionately high among sexual minority populations. Few studies have examined the plausible relationship between minority stress and IPV among men who have sex with men. This study examines the associations between IPV and three indicators of minority stress: internalized homophobia, sexuality-based discrimination, and racism, in a large venue-based sample of gay and bisexual men from Atlanta, USA. Each of the minority stress measures was found to be significantly associated with increased odds of self-reporting any form of receipt of IPV. Significant associations were also identified between perpetration of IPV and minority stressors, with most types of IPV perpetration linked to internalized homophobia. This study confirms findings in a growing body of research supporting the relationship between minority stress and increased prevalence of IPV among men who have sex with men, and points to the need to address structural factors in IPV prevention programs for male–male couples.

Copyright information:

© The Author(s) 2016.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/).

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