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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Carolyn Miller Reilly, RN, PhD, CHFN, FAHA (cmill02@emory.edu). Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University 1520 Clifton Rd, NE #366 Atlanta, GA 30322 Office: 404-727-9658, Fax 404-727-9382

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Study Supported by the NIH/ NINR NRSA 5F32 NR010451-02(C.M. Reilly, PI), Interdisciplinary Pilot Research Grant NIH/NINR P20 NR007798, the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR00045; and Biosite, Inc. Grant In Aid of equipment and supplies.

The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Nursing
  • Research design
  • Heart failure
  • Fluid therapy
  • Electric impedance
  • Self-care
  • CONGESTIVE-HEART-FAILURE
  • BREAST-CANCER SURVIVORS
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • ELDERLY-PATIENTS
  • INTRATHORACIC IMPEDANCE
  • RESOURCE UTILIZATION
  • RANDOMIZED-TRIAL
  • LIPID PROFILES
  • THERAPY
  • INTERVENTION

Single subject design: Use of time series analyses in a small cohort to understand adherence with a prescribed fluid restriction

Tools:

Journal Title:

Applied Nursing Research

Volume:

Volume 28, Number 4

Publisher:

, Pages 356-365

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Purpose: This paper presents a secondary in-depth analysis of five persons with heart failure randomized to receive an education and behavioral intervention on fluid restriction as part of a larger study. Methods: Using a single subject analysis design, time series analyses models were constructed for each of the five patients for a period of 180. days to determine correlations between daily measures of patient reported fluid intake, thoracic impedance, and weights, and relationships between patient reported outcomes of symptom burden and health related quality of life over time. Results: Negative relationships were observed between fluid intake and thoracic impedance, and between impedance and weight, while positive correlations were observed between daily fluid intake and weight. Conclusions: By constructing time series analyses of daily measures of fluid congestion, trends and patterns of fluid congestion emerged which could be used to guide individualized patient care or future research endeavors. Employment of such a specialized analysis technique allows for the elucidation of clinically relevant findings potentially disguised when only evaluating aggregate outcomes of larger studies.

Copyright information:

© 2015 Elsevier Inc.

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