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Author Notes:

Correspondence Daurice A. Grossniklaus, PhD, MEd, RN, 1836 Grist Stone Ct, Atlanta, GA 30307 (dgrossn@hotmail.com).

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by funding from The National Institutes of Health, National Institute for Nursing Research, National Research Service Award; Nurses Educational Funds, Inc.; American Nurses Foundation; Southern Nurses Research Society; Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Epsilon Chapter; National Institutes of Health, National Center for Research Resources, PHS Grant UL1RR025008 Clinical and Translational Science Award program and PHS Grant MO1 RR0039 General Clinical Research Center program.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Cardiac & Cardiovascular Systems
  • Nursing
  • Cardiovascular System & Cardiology
  • depressive symptoms
  • dietary energy density
  • overweight
  • psychological distress
  • ENERGY-DENSITY
  • FOOD-INTAKE
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • UNITED-STATES
  • US ADULTS
  • DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
  • ABDOMINAL OBESITY
  • WEIGHT CONTROL
  • COMMUNITY
  • STRESS

Psychological Factors Are Important Correlates of Dietary Pattern in Overweight Adults

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing

Volume:

Volume 25, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 450-460

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Introduction and Purpose: Abdominal obesity, the central distribution of adipose tissue, is a well-established cardiometabolic disease risk factor. The prevalence has steadily increased since 1988, and now more than 50% of adults have abdominal obesity. Psychological distress coupled with increased dietary energy density (ED) may contribute to abdominal obesity. Guided by the stress and coping model, this study examined the relationship between psychological factors (perceived stress and depressive symptoms) and dietary ED in overweight, working adults. The first hypothesis tested if psychological factors explained a significant amount of food and beverage ED variance above that accounted for by demographic factors. The second hypothesis tested if psychological factors explained a significant amount of food and nonalcoholic beverage ED variance above that accounted for by demographic factors. Post hoc analyses compared macronutrient composition and food group pattern between overweight, working adults with and without depressive symptoms. Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional, correlation study was composed of 87 overweight, working adults (mean age, 41.3 [SD, 10.2] years; mean body mass index, 32.1 [SD, 6.1] kg/m 2 ; 73.6% women; 50.6% African American). Participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory II and Perceived Stress Scale and weighed-3-day-food record analyzed for caloric intake (kilocalories) and weight (in grams) of consumed foods and beverages that were used to calculate ED (in kilocalories/gram). Height and weight were measured to calculate body mass index. Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U test, and sequential regression modeling were used for data analysis. Results: Depressive symptoms were reported by 21.9% of participants and explained variance in food and beverage ED above that accounted for by African American race and reporting adequate caloric intake. Depressive symptoms explained variance in food and nonalcoholic beverage ED above that accounted for male sex, African American race, and reporting adequate caloric intake. Perceived stress and depressive symptoms were positively correlated; however, perceived stress was not a significant predictor of food and beverage ED. Conclusions: Depressive symptoms, potentially modifiable, were 4 times that found in the general population and independently predicted increased food and beverage ED. Further Research is needed to determine if improvements in depressive symptoms alter dietary ED, potentially reducing cardiometabolic disease risk.

Copyright information:

Copyright © 2010 Wolters Kluwer Health. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

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