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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: 1836 Grist Stone Ct., Atlanta, GA 30307; dgrossn@hotmail.com

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Funded by: National Institutes of Health.

National Institute for Nursing Research.

National Research Service Award 1F31; Contract grant number: NR010159-01A1.

Nurses Educational Funds, Inc.

American Nurses Foundation.

Southern Nurses Research Society.

Sigma Theta Tau International, Alpha Epsilon Chapter.

National Institutes of Health.

National Center for Research Resources PHS Grant; Contract Grant number: UL1RR025008.

Clinical and Translational Science Award Program and PHS Grant; Contract grant number: MO1 RR0039.

General Clinical Research Center Program.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Nursing
  • obesity
  • depression
  • lifestyle change
  • prevention
  • CORONARY-ARTERY-DISEASE
  • VISCERAL ADIPOSE-TISSUE
  • BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION
  • METABOLIC SYNDROME
  • ABDOMINAL OBESITY
  • INSULIN-RESISTANCE
  • US ADULTS
  • CORTISOL
  • DEPRESSION
  • WOMEN

Biobehavioral and Psychological Differences Between Overweight Adults With and Without Waist Circumference Risk

Tools:

Journal Title:

Research in Nursing and Health

Volume:

Volume 33, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 539-551

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Waist circumference (WC) has emerged as an independent predictor of cardiometabolic disease. The purpose of this study was to examine differences between overweight adults with and without WC risk in four domains: demographic, clinical and biological, psychological, and behavioral. The sample (N = 87) was primarily sedentary, middle-aged, women, and African-Americans. The majority of participants had WC risk, those with WC risk were older, were women, and had higher body mass index, higher morning salivary cortisol levels, and more depressive symptoms than those without WC risk. Caloric and macronutrient intake did not differ between those with and without WC risk. Our findings could lead to the development of targeted interventions to prevent and/or reduce abdominal obesity, thereby reducing cardiometabolic risk.

Copyright information:

© 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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