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Author Notes:

Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 404 727 8350; fax: +1 404 727 3969. oousley@emory.edu (O.Y. Ousley).

A. Nichole Evans and Danielle Tidwell provided research assistance.

O.Y. Ousley Clinical trials: Collaborator in BioMarin Pharmaceutical study.

J.F. Cubells Clinical trials: Co-investigator for Seaside Therapeutics, Roche, Schering-Plough, Lilly, and Biomarin. Advisor Abott Laboratories.

E. Smearman, E.F. Walker, K. Coleman, K.A. Rockers, S. Fernandez-Carriba declare that they have no conflicts of interest concerning this article.

Portions of these data were presented at the 8th Biennial 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Meeting, Orlando, Florida, July 8, 2012.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Grant support: Robert W. Woodruff Fund (J.F. Cubells, O.Y. Ousley), NARSAD (O.Y. Ousley), the Autism Foundation of Georgia (J.F. Cubells), NIH Medical Scientist Training grant T32 GM008169 (E. Smearman), and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (Grant number 008188; E. Smearman).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Psychiatry
  • Schizophrenia and psychosis
  • Autism
  • Affective disorders
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Genetics
  • CARDIO-FACIAL SYNDROME
  • AUTISTIC SPECTRUM DISORDERS
  • INTERRATER RELIABILITY
  • PREDICTIVE-VALIDITY
  • PRODROMAL SYNDROMES
  • DE-NOVO
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • SYMPTOMS
  • INTERVIEW
  • ONSET

Axis I psychiatric diagnoses in adolescents and young adults with 22q11 deletion syndrome

Tools:

Journal Title:

European Psychiatry

Volume:

Volume 28, Number 7

Publisher:

, Pages 417-422

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) associates with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (SSDs), autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), and other psychiatric disorders, but co-occurrence of diagnoses are not well described. Methods: We evaluated the co-occurrence of SSDs, ASDs and other axis I psychiatric diagnoses in 31 adolescents and adults with 22q11DS, assessing ASDs using either stringent Collaborative Program for Excellence in Autism (ASD-CPEA) criteria, or less stringent DSM-IV criteria alone (ASD-DSM-IV). Results: Ten (32%) individuals met criteria for an SSD, five (16%) for ASD-CPEA, and five others (16%) for ASD-DSM-IV. Of those with ASD-CPEA, one (20%) met SSD criteria. Of those with ASD-DSM-IV, four (80%) met SSD criteria. Depressive disorders (8 individuals; 26%) and anxiety disorders (7; 23%) sometimes co-occurred with SSDs and ASDs. SSDs, ASDs, and anxiety occurred predominantly among males and depression predominantly among females. Conclusions: Individuals with 22q11DS can manifest SSDs in the presence or absence of ASDs and other axis I diagnoses. The results suggest that standard clinical care should include childhood screening for ASDs, and later periodic screening for all axis I diagnoses. © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS.

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