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Author Notes:

Address reprint requests to: J.G.D., Department of Radiology, Emory University Hospital, Ste. AG30, 1364 Clifton Rd., Atlanta, GA 30322. jana.delfino@emory.edu.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
  • RADIOLOGY, NUCLEAR MEDICINE & MEDICAL IMAGING
  • phase contrast
  • MRI
  • myocardial dyssynchrony
  • cross-correlation
  • CRT
  • CARDIAC RESYNCHRONIZATION THERAPY
  • LEFT-VENTRICULAR DYSSYNCHRONY
  • BIVENTRICULAR PACING THERAPY
  • HEART-FAILURE PATIENTS
  • QRS DURATION
  • ASYNCHRONY
  • PREDICTS
  • BENEFIT
  • ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY
  • QUANTIFICATION

Cross-Correlation Delay to Quantify Myocardial Dyssynchrony From Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance (PCMR) Velocity Data

Tools:

Journal Title:

Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Volume:

Volume 28, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 1086-1091

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Purpose: To apply cross-correlation delay (XCD) analysis to myocardial phase contrast magnetic resonance (PCMR) tissue velocity data and to compare XCD to three established "time-to-peak" dyssynchrony parameters. Materials and Methods: Myocardial tissue velocity was acquired using PCMR in 10 healthy volunteers (negative controls) and 10 heart failure patients who met criteria for cardiac resynchronization therapy (positive controls). All dyssynchrony parameters were computed from PCMR velocity curves. Sensitivity, specificity, and receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis for separating positive and negative controls were computed for each dyssynchrony parameter. Results: XCD had higher sensitivity (90%) and specificity (100%) for discriminating between normal and patient groups than any of the time-to-peak dyssynchrony parameters. ROC analysis showed that XCD was the best parameter for separating the positive and negative control groups. Conclusion:XCD is superior to time-to-peak dyssynchrony parameters for discriminating between subjects with and without dyssynchrony and may aid in the selection of patients for cardiac resynchronization therapy.

Copyright information:

© 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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