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Author Notes:

Corresponding author at: 615 Michael Street, Suite 600, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Tel.: +1 404 727 9022; fax: +1 404 727 2648. gretchen.neigh@emory.edu, neighmac@gmail.com (G.N. Neigh).

We gratefully acknowledge support of the Vada and Theodore Stanley Foundation for the Mentally Ill, who supported development of the selectively bred lines of rats used in this research.

We also thank Jillybeth Burgado of the Neuroscience and Behavioral Biology Program at Emory University for her tireless technical assistance.

All authors declare that they have no conflicts of interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Funding was provided by unrestricted funds from the Child and Adolescent Mood Program; the funding source had no role in study design, data collection, analysis and interpretation of data, manuscript preparation, or the decision to submit for publication.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Behavioral Sciences
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES
  • NEUROSCIENCES
  • Forced swim
  • Stress
  • Adolescent
  • Sex
  • Depressive-like
  • Selective breeding
  • Sucrose preference
  • Stress susceptible
  • Stress resistant
  • Open field
  • FORCED SWIMMING TEST
  • ANIMAL-MODEL
  • ANTIDEPRESSANT TREATMENTS
  • MOTOR-ACTIVITY
  • FEMALE RATS
  • DEPRESSION
  • DISORDERS
  • SUSCEPTIBILITY
  • VALIDITY
  • ANXIETY

Sex and lineage interact to predict behavioral effects of chronic adolescent stress in rats

Tools:

Journal Title:

Behavioural Brain Research

Volume:

Volume 248

Publisher:

, Pages 57-61

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Neuropsychiatric disorders often derive from environmental influences that occur at important stages of development and interact with genetics. This study examined the effects of stress during adolescence in rats selectively bred for different behavioral responses to stress. The effects of chronic adolescent stress were compared between rats selected for susceptibility to reduced activity following acute stress (Swim-test Susceptible rats) and rats resistant to activity reduction after acute stress (Swim-test Resistant rats). Consistent with lineage, exposure to chronic adolescent stress increased swim-test activity of the Swim-test Resistant rats while tending to reduce activity of the Swim-test Susceptible rats. Consistent with the increased activity demonstrated post-stress in the swim test, chronic adolescent stress increased total activity in the open field for Swim-test Resistant rats. Indicative of anhedonia, chronic adolescent stress exposure decreased sucrose consumption in both male and female Swim-test Resistant rats but only in female Swim-test Susceptible rats. Although chronic stress induced changes in behavior across both breeding lines, the precise manifestation of the behavioral change was dependent on both breeding line and sex. Collectively, these data indicate that selective breeding interacts with chronic stress exposure during adolescence to dictate behavioral outcomes.

Copyright information:

© 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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