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Author Notes:

Correspondence: djkatz@emory.edu

MAC, SMK, and DJK wrote the manuscript.

All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

We would like to thank T. Lee, A. Scott, A. Engstrom, B. Kelly, and H. Gabel for their thoughtful comments on the manuscript.

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

SMK was supported by the Emory CND training grant (T32NS007480).

MAC was supported by the Emory GMB training grant (T32GM008490).

This work was supported by a grant to DJK from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (1R01NS087142).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Genetics & Heredity
  • Neuroepigenetics
  • DNA methylation
  • Histone modification
  • Rett syndrome
  • Fragile X syndrome
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • MECP2
  • FMR1
  • LSD1/KDM1A
  • FRAGILE-X-SYNDROME
  • FAMILIAL ALZHEIMERS-DISEASE
  • HISTONE DEACETYLASE COMPLEX
  • DNA METHYLATION LANDSCAPE
  • MEMORY FORMATION
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • TRANSCRIPTIONAL REPRESSION
  • SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY
  • BINDING PROTEIN
  • NERVOUS-SYSTEM

Neuroepigenetic mechanisms in disease

Tools:

Journal Title:

Epigenetics and Chromatin

Volume:

Volume 10, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 47-47

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Epigenetics allows for the inheritance of information in cellular lineages during differentiation, independent of changes to the underlying genetic sequence. This raises the question of whether epigenetic mechanisms also function in post-mitotic neurons. During the long life of the neuron, fluctuations in gene expression allow the cell to pass through stages of differentiation, modulate synaptic activity in response to environmental cues, and fortify the cell through age-related neuroprotective pathways. Emerging evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and histone modification permit these dynamic changes in gene expression throughout the life of a neuron. Accordingly, recent studies have revealed the vital importance of epigenetic players in the central nervous system and during neurodegeneration. Here, we provide a review of several of these recent findings, highlighting novel functions for epigenetics in the fields of Rett syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, and Alzheimer's disease research. Together, these discoveries underscore the vital importance of epigenetics in human neurological disorders.

Copyright information:

© 2017 The Author(s).

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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