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Author Notes:

Correspondence and requests for materials should be addressed to P.J. (email: peng.jin@emory.edu)

B.Y., Y.C. and P.J. conceived and designed the project.

B.Y., Y.C., Z.W., Y.L., L.H., W.Z. and D.C. performed the experiments.

B.Y. performed the bioinformatics analyses.

L.C. assisted with the computational coding.

D.C. and B.T. contributed the reagents.

B.Y. and P.J. wrote the manuscript.

All authors commented on the manuscript.

Bing Yao and Ying Cheng contributed equally to this work.

We would like to thank B.L. Philips for critical reading of the manuscript.

Publisher's note: Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported in part by NIH grants (NS051630, NS079625, MH102690 and NS097206 to P.J.)

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • DIFFERENTIAL EXPRESSION ANALYSIS
  • MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX
  • MAJOR DEPRESSION
  • RESTRAINT STRESS
  • GENE-EXPRESSION
  • MAMMALIAN BRAIN
  • LIFE STRESS
  • METHYLATION
  • MICE
  • TRANSCRIPTION

DNA N6-methyladenine is dynamically regulated in the mouse brain following environmental stress

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Journal Title:

Nature Communications

Volume:

Volume 8, Number 1

Publisher:

, Pages 1122-1122

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Chemical modifications on DNA molecules, such as 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, play important roles in the mammalian brain. A novel DNA adenine modification, N(6)-methyladenine (6mA), has recently been found in mammalian cells. However, the presence and function(s) of 6mA in the mammalian brain remain unclear. Here we demonstrate 6mA dynamics in the mouse brain in response to environmental stress. We find that overall 6mA levels are significantly elevated upon stress. Genome-wide 6mA and transcriptome profiling reveal an inverse association between 6mA dynamic changes and a set of upregulated neuronal genes or downregulated LINE transposon expression. Genes bearing stress-induced 6mA changes significantly overlap with loci associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. These results suggest an epigenetic role for 6mA in the mammalian brain as well as its potential involvement in neuropsychiatric disorders.

Copyright information:

© 2017 The Author(s).

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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