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Author Notes:

Robert D. Latzman E-mail: rlatzman@gsu.edu

Conceived and designed the experiments: RDL WDH.

Analyzed the data: RDL WDH.

Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: ACK LJY.

Wrote the paper: RDL WDH.

Thank you to Scott Lilienfeld for his helpful comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript and to Mariya Malikina and Taralee Hamner for their assistance with formatting.

The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This research was supported in part by National Institutes of Health grants NS-42867, HD-38051, and HD-56232.

Additional support was provided by the National Center for Research Resources P51RR165 to YNPRC, which is currently supported by the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs/OD P51OD11132.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCES
  • HIGHER-ORDER FACTORS
  • ZOOLOGICAL PARKS
  • FLANKING REGION
  • 5-FACTOR MODEL
  • PRAIRIE VOLES
  • AVPR1A GENE
  • BIG 5
  • BEHAVIOR
  • MICROSATELLITE
  • ADOLESCENCE

Personality in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes): Exploring the Hierarchical Structure and Associations with the Vasopressin V1A Receptor Gene

Tools:

Journal Title:

PLoS ONE

Volume:

Volume 9, Number 4

Publisher:

, Pages e95741-e95741

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

One of the major contributions of recent personality psychology is the finding that traits are related to each other in an organized hierarchy. To date, however, researchers have yet to investigate this hierarchy in nonhuman primates. Such investigations are critical in confirming the cross-species nature of trait personality helping to illuminate personality as neurobiologically-based and evolutionarily-derived dimensions of primate disposition. Investigations of potential genetic polymorphisms associated with hierarchical models of personality among nonhuman primates represent a critical first step. The current study examined the hierarchical structure of chimpanzee personality as well as sex-specific associations with a polymorphism in the promoter region of the vasopressin V1a receptor gene (AVPR1A), a gene associated with dispositional traits, among 174 chimpanzees. Results confirmed a hierarchical structure of personality across species and, despite differences in early rearing experiences, suggest a sexually dimorphic role of AVPR1A polymorphisms on hierarchical personality profiles at a higher-order level. © 2014 Latzman et al.

Copyright information:

© 2014 Latzman et al.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).
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