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Author Notes:

Inquires regarding this paper may be sent to: William D. Hopkins, Neuroscience Institute, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5030, Atlanta, Georgia 30302-5030. Email: whopkins4@gsu.edu or whopkin@emory.edu.

W.D.H. designed, analyzed and wrote the manuscript. A.K. and L.Y.

assisted in data collection, data analysis and writing of the manuscript.

L.R. and J.S. assisted in data collection and S.S. assisted in writing.

All authors have read the manuscript and have agreed to the content.

We would like to thank Yerkes National Primate Research Center and the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and their respective veterinary and care staffs for assistance in blood collection.

American Psychological Association guidelines for the treatment of animals were followed during all aspects of this study.

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This research was supported by NIH grants MH-92923, NS-42867, NS-73134,HD-60563 to WDH, MH064692 and MH56897 to L.J.Y.

Cooperative Agreement RR-15090 to M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, and National Center for Research Resources P51RR165 to YNPRC, which is currently supported by the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs/OD P51OD11132).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Multidisciplinary Sciences
  • Science & Technology - Other Topics
  • MULTIDISCIPLINARY SCIENCES
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • EXTENDED PEDIGREE
  • FLANKING REGION
  • RHESUS MACAQUES
  • VERVET MONKEYS
  • MESSENGER-RNA
  • PRAIRIE VOLES
  • VASOPRESSIN
  • BEHAVIOR
  • MICROSATELLITE

Genetic Influences on Receptive Joint Attention in Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

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Journal Title:

Scientific Reports

Volume:

Volume 4

Publisher:

, Pages 3774-3774

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Despite their genetic similarity to humans, our understanding of the role of genes on cognitive traits in chimpanzees remains virtually unexplored. Here, we examined the relationship between genetic variation in the arginine vasopressin V1a receptor gene (AVPR1A) and social cognition in chimpanzees. Studies have shown that chimpanzees are polymorphic for a deletion in a sequence in the 5′ flanking region of the AVPR1A, DupB, which contains the variable RS3 repetitive element, which has been associated with variation in social behavior in humans. Results revealed that performance on the social cognition task was significantly her itable. Furthermore, males with one DupB + allele performed significantly better and were more responsive to socio-communicative cues than males homozygous for the DupB- deletion. Performance on a non-social cognition task was not associated with the AVPR1A genotype. The collective findings show that AVPR1A polymorphisms are associated with individual differences in performance on a receptive joint attention task in chimpanzees.

Copyright information:

© 2014, Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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