About this item:

271 Views | 116 Downloads

Author Notes:

Author for correspondence (sma@stowers.org)

S.M.A. thanks Dr S. Haralalka for critical discussions and assistance in the writing this review.

Deposited in PMC for release after 12 months.

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

S.M.A. is supported by the Stowers Institute for Medical Research and by the National Institutes of Heath.

G.K.P. is supported by the National Institutes of Health and by the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Developmental Biology
  • DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
  • Founder cell
  • Fusion-competent myoblast
  • Myoblast
  • Myocyte
  • Myotube
  • Myofiber
  • Satellite cell
  • Regeneration
  • Migration
  • Adhesion
  • Myogenesis
  • SKELETAL-MUSCLE REGENERATION
  • ALDRICH-SYNDROME PROTEIN
  • MYOGENIC PRECURSOR CELLS
  • WAVE REGULATORY COMPLEX
  • DIGITORUM LONGUS MUSCLE
  • IN-VITRO
  • SATELLITE CELLS
  • M-CADHERIN
  • ROLLING-PEBBLES
  • ACTIN-POLYMERIZATION

Myoblast fusion: lessons from flies and mice

Tools:

Journal Title:

Development

Volume:

Volume 139, Number 4

Publisher:

, Pages 641-656

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

The fusion of myoblasts into multinucleate syncytia plays a fundamental role in muscle function, as it supports the formation of extended sarcomeric arrays, or myofibrils, within a large volume of cytoplasm. Principles learned from the study of myoblast fusion not only enhance our understanding of myogenesis, but also contribute to our perspectives on membrane fusion and cell-cell fusion in a wide array of model organisms and experimental systems. Recent studies have advanced our views of the cell biological processes and crucial proteins that drive myoblast fusion. Here, we provide an overview of myoblast fusion in three model systems that have contributed much to our understanding of these events: the Drosophila embryo; developing and regenerating mouse muscle; and cultured rodent muscle cells.

Copyright information:

© 2012. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

Export to EndNote