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Author Notes:

Correspondence: Yehezkel Ben-Ari, INMED, Parc scientifique de Luminy, BP 13, 13273 Marseille Cedex 09, France. e-mail: ben-ari@inmed.univ-mrs.fr

We are grateful to A. Kriegstein for his suggestions and to G. Huberfeld for providing his unpublished observations.

The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

Subjects:

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • NEUROSCIENCES
  • GABA
  • giant depolarizing potentials
  • energy substrates
  • brain slices
  • chloride homeostasis
  • development
  • NEONATAL-RAT HIPPOCAMPUS
  • CAJAL-RETZIUS CELLS
  • INTRACELLULAR CHLORIDE CONCENTRATION
  • INHIBITORY POSTSYNAPTIC POTENTIALS
  • DEVELOPING HYPOTHALAMIC NEURONS
  • RECEPTOR-MEDIATED CURRENTS
  • GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC-ACID
  • TEMPORAL-LOBE EPILEPSY
  • CA1 PYRAMIDAL NEURONS
  • ROOT GANGLION NEURONS

Refuting the challenges of the developmental shift of polarity of GABA actions: GABA more exciting than ever!

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Journal Title:

Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience

Volume:

Volume 6, Number JULY 2012

Publisher:

, Pages 35-35

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

During brain development, there is a progressive reduction of intracellular chloride associated with a shift in GABA polarity: GABA depolarizes and occasionally excites immature neurons, subsequently hyperpolarizing them at later stages of development. This sequence, which has been observed in a wide range of animal species, brain structures and preparations, is thought to play an important role in activity-dependent formation and modulation of functional circuits. This sequence has also been considerably reinforced recently with new data pointing to an evolutionary preserved rule. In a recent 'Hypothesis and Theory Article', the excitatory action of GABA in early brain development is suggested to be "an experimental artefact" (Bregestovski and Bernard, 2012). The authors suggest that the excitatory action of GABA is due to an inadequate/insufficient energy supply in glucose-perfused slices and/or to the damage produced by the slicing procedure. However, these observations have been repeatedly contradicted by many groups and are inconsistent with a large body of evidence including the fact that the developmental shift is neither restricted to slices nor to rodents. We summarize the overwhelming evidence in support of both excitatory GABA during development, and the implications this has in developmental neurobiology.

Copyright information:

© 2012 Ben-ari, Woodin, Sernagor, Cancedda, Vinay, Rivera,Legendre, Luhmann, Bordey, Wenner, Fukuda, Pol, Jean-luc and Cherubini.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).

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