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Author Notes:

E-mail: suba.krishnan@jefferson.edu

Subjects:

Research Funding:

Supported by Grant #U54 HL-070585 from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Hematology
  • HEMATOLOGY
  • sickle cell disease
  • inflammation
  • paediatric haematology
  • vascular biology
  • PERIPHERAL ARTERIAL-DISEASE
  • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
  • P-SELECTIN
  • PULMONARY-HYPERTENSION
  • LACTATE-DEHYDROGENASE
  • PREDICTION
  • CHILDREN
  • MARKERS
  • RISK
  • MORTALITY

Increased levels of the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein at baseline are associated with childhood sickle cell vasocclusive crises

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Journal Title:

British Journal of Haematology

Volume:

Volume 148, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 797-804

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Several lines of evidence suggest that sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with a chronic inflammatory state. In this study of 70 children with SCD at steady state evaluated by a broad panel of biomarkers representing previously examined mechanisms of pathogenicity in SCD, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a marker of low-grade, systemic inflammation, emerged as the most significant laboratory correlate of hospitalizations for pain or vaso-occlusive (VOC) events. While markers of increased haemolytic status, endothelial activation and coagulation activation all correlated positively with VOC events by univariate analysis, baseline hs-CRP levels provided the most significant contribution to the association in multiple regression models (22%), and, hs-CRP, along with age, provided the best fit in negative binomial models. These data highlight the clinical relevance of the role of inflammation in paediatric VOC, providing both a rationale for future therapeutic strategies targeting inflammation in microvessel occlusive complications of SCD, and the potential clinical use of hs-CRP as a biomarker in childhood SCD.

Copyright information:

© 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 2.5 Generic License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.5/).

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