About this item:

204 Views | 126 Downloads

Author Notes:

Correspondence should be addressed to Dr. M. Mar Sánchez, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 1639 Pierce Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322. E-mail:sanchez@rmy.emory.edu.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center base Grant RR-00165 (Comparative Medicine Program, National Center for Research Resources of the National Institutes of Health), Grant MH58922 (P.M.P.), and the Klingenstein Third Generation Foundation Fellowship in Childhood and Adolescent Depression (M.M.S.). We thank Drs. Y. Smith, A. Miller, and B. Pearce for their help and suggestions during this study.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • NEUROSCIENCES
  • hippocampus
  • glucocorticoid receptor
  • mineralo-corticoid receptor
  • rhesus monkey
  • immunohistochemistry
  • in situ hybridization
  • HUMAN MINERALOCORTICOID RECEPTOR
  • MESSENGER-RNA EXPRESSION
  • CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM
  • IN-SITU HYBRIDIZATION
  • RAT-BRAIN
  • PRIMATE BRAIN
  • IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURONS
  • NONHUMAN-PRIMATES
  • PYRAMIDAL NEURONS
  • GENE-EXPRESSION

Journal Title:

Journal of Neuroscience Nursing

Volume:

Volume 20, Number 12

Publisher:

, Pages 4657-4668

Type of Work:

Article | Final Publisher PDF

Abstract:

Chronic stress has been associated with degenerative changes in the rodent and primate hippocampus, presumably mediated in part via neuronal glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). In the rat brain, GRs are widely distributed and are particularly dense in the hippocampus. The distribution of GRs in the primate brain, however, has not been fully characterized. In this study, we used in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry to map the distribution of GR mRNA and GR protein, respectively, in adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta). In contrast to its well established distribution in the rat brain, GR mRNA was only weakly detected in the dentate gyrus (DG) and Cornu Ammonis (CA) of the macaque hippocampus, whereas it was abundant in the pituitary (PIT), cerebellum (CBL), hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and, to a lesser extent, the neocortex. Immunohistochemical staining indicated a very low density of GR-like immunoreactive cells within the macaque hippocampal formation in contrast to the high density observed within the PVN, prefrontal and entorhinal cortices and cerebellar cortex. Relative to the low level of GR, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mRNA and protein expression were abundant within the DG and CA of the rhesus monkey hippocampal formation. These results indicate that, in the primate, neocortical and hypothalamic areas may be more important targets for GR- mediated effects of glucocorticoids than the hippocampus. Alternatively, it is also possible that glucocorticoid effects are mediated through the MRs present in the hippocampal formation.

Copyright information:

© 2000 Society for Neuroscience

Export to EndNote