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Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: Cristina T. Navarrete, P.O. Box 016960 (R-131), Miami, FL 33136; Tel 305-585-6408; Fax 305-545-6581; cnavarrete@med.miami.edu

We are indebted to our medical and nursing colleagues and the infants and their parents who agreed to take part in this study.

Participating sites collected data and transmitted it to RTI International, the data coordinating center for the network, which stored, managed, and analyzed the data for this study.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

The National Institutes of Health, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute provided grant support for the Neonatal Research Network’s SUPPORT Trial.

Additional funding information is available at www.jpeds.com (Appendix).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Pediatrics
  • NEONATAL RESEARCH NETWORK
  • INTENSIVE-CARE-UNIT
  • WEIGHT INFANTS
  • BRONCHOPULMONARY DYSPLASIA
  • INTRAUTERINE GROWTH
  • CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • PULSE OXIMETRY
  • RETINOPATHY
  • HYPOXEMIA
  • GESTATION

Growth Outcomes of Preterm Infants Exposed to Different Oxygen Saturation Target Ranges from Birth

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Journal Title:

Journal of Pediatrics

Volume:

Volume 176

Publisher:

, Pages 62-+

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Objective: To test whether infants randomized to a lower oxygen saturation (peripheral capillary oxygen saturation [SpO 2 ]) target range while on supplemental oxygen from birth will have better growth velocity from birth to 36 weeks postmenstrual age (PMA) and less growth failure at 36 weeks PMA and 18-22 months corrected age. Study design: We evaluated a subgroup of 810 preterm infants from the Surfactant, Positive Pressure, and Oxygenation Randomized Trial, randomized at birth to lower (85%-89%, n = 402, PMA 26 ± 1 weeks, birth weight 839 ± 186 g) or higher (91%-95%, n = 408, PMA 26 ± 1 weeks, birth weight 840 ± 191 g) SpO 2 target ranges. Anthropometric measures were obtained at birth, postnatal days 7, 14, 21, and 28; then at 32 and 36 weeks PMA; and 18-22 months corrected age. Growth velocities were estimated with the exponential method and analyzed with linear mixed models. Poor growth outcome, defined as weight < 10th percentile at 36 weeks PMA and 18-22 months corrected age, was compared across the 2 treatment groups by the use of robust Poisson regression. Results: Growth outcomes including growth at 36 weeks PMA and 18-22 months corrected age, as well as growth velocity were similar in the lower and higher SpO 2 target groups. Conclusion: Targeting different oxygen saturation ranges between 85% and 95% from birth did not impact growth velocity or reduce growth failure in preterm infants.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Elsevier Inc.

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