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Author Notes:

Corresponding author. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, 954 Gatewood Dr., Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. jswils4@emory.edu

We would like to thank Ebony Glover, Renuka Reddy, and Ye Ji Kim for their assistance with MRI data collection, and Allan Graham, Angelo Brown, and the Grady Trauma Project staff for their work in recruiting participants.

The authors declare no conflict of interest, financial or otherwise.

Jennifer Stevens had full access to all of the data in the study and takes responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was primarily supported by the National Institutes of Mental Health (MH098212 to T.J., F32MH101976 to J.S.S., MH071537 to K.J.R.).

Support was also received from Emory and Grady Memorial Hospital General Clinical Research Center, NIH National Centers for Research Resources (M01RR00039), National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the NIH (UL1TR000454), and Howard Hughes Medical Institute (K.J.R.).

Keywords:

  • Social Sciences
  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Psychology, Clinical
  • Psychiatry
  • Psychology
  • stress
  • development
  • fMRI
  • neuroimaging
  • prefrontal cortex
  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • IMPAIRED FEAR INHIBITION
  • EARLY-LIFE STRESS
  • SEXUAL-ABUSE
  • PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES
  • RESPONSE-INHIBITION
  • AMYGDALA RESPONSE
  • EMOTIONAL NEGLECT
  • NEGATIVE EMOTION
  • LOW-INCOME

CHILDHOOD MALTREATMENT PREDICTS REDUCED INHIBITION-RELATED ACTIVITY IN THE ROSTRAL ANTERIOR CINGULATE IN PTSD, BUT NOT TRAUMA-EXPOSED CONTROLS

Tools:

Journal Title:

Depression and Anxiety

Volume:

Volume 33, Number 7

Publisher:

, Pages 614-622

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: A deficit in the ability to inhibit fear has been proposed as a biomarker of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Previous research indicates that individuals with PTSD show reduced inhibition-related activation in rostral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC). The goal of the current study was to investigate differential influences of an early environmental risk factor for PTSD—childhood maltreatment—on inhibition-related brain function in individuals with PTSD versus trauma-exposed controls. Methods: Individuals with PTSD (n = 37) and trauma-exposed controls (n = 53) were recruited from the primary care waiting rooms of an urban public hospital in Atlanta, GA. Participants completed an inhibition task during fMRI, and reported childhood and adult traumatic experiences. The groups were matched for adult and child trauma load. Results: We observed an interaction between childhood maltreatment severity and PTSD status in the rACC (P < .05, corrected), such that maltreatment was negatively associated with inhibition-related rACC activation in the PTSD group, but did not influence rACC activation in the TC group. Rostral ACC activation was associated with inhibition-related task performance in the TC group but not the PTSD group, suggesting a possible contribution to stress resilience. Conclusions: Findings highlight individual differences in neural function following childhood trauma, and point to inhibition-related activation in rostral ACC as a risk factor for PTSD.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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