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Author Notes:

Corresponding author: Kenneth E. Izuora, University of Nevada School of Medicine, Internal Medicine, 1701 W. Charleston Blvd., Suite 230, Las Vegas, NV 89102, Tel: +1 702 671 2345, Fax: +1 702 671 2376, kizoura@medicine.nevada.edu

Conflict of Interest: None of the authors have any potential conflicts of interest relevant to this article to declare.

Subject:

Research Funding:

This study was funded by NIH/NIGMS grant #1U54GM104944-01.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Medicine, General & Internal
  • General & Internal Medicine
  • Periodontal disease
  • Diabetes complications
  • Inflammation markers
  • Bone turnover markers
  • C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
  • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
  • SYSTEMIC INFLAMMATION
  • MINERAL DENSITY
  • CLINICAL-TRIAL
  • RISK
  • ENDOCRINOLOGISTS
  • OSTEOPOROSIS
  • BEHAVIORS
  • KNOWLEDGE

Changes in Inflammatory and Bone Turnover Markers After Periodontal Disease Treatment in Patients With Diabetes

Tools:

Journal Title:

American Journal of the Medical Sciences

Volume:

Volume 351, Number 6

Publisher:

, Pages 589-594

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Background: The underlying mechanisms for increased osteopenia and fracture rates in patients with diabetes are not well understood, but may relate to chronic systemic inflammation. We assessed the effect of treating periodontal disease (POD), a cause of chronic inflammation, on inflammatory and bone turnover markers in patients with diabetes. Materials and Methods: Using an investigator-administered questionnaire, we screened a cross-section of patients presenting for routine outpatient diabetes care. We recruited 22 subjects with POD. Inflammatory and bone turnover markers were measured at baseline and 3 months following POD treatment (scaling, root planing and subantimicrobial dose doxycycline). Results: There were nonsignificant reductions in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (6.34–5.52 mg/L, P = 0.626) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (10.37–10.01 pg/mL, P = 0.617). There were nonsignificant increases in urinary C-terminal telopeptide (85.50–90.23 pg/mL, P = 0.684) and bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (7.45–8.79 pg/mL, P = 0.074). Patients with >90% adherence with doxycycline were 6.4 times more likely to experience reduction in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (P = 0.021) and 2.8 times more likely to experience reductions in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (P = 0.133). Conclusions: Treatment of POD in patients with diabetes resulted in nonsignificant lowering of inflammatory markers and nonsignificant increase in bone turnover markers. However, adherence to doxycycline therapy resulted in better treatment effects.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation

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