About this item:

184 Views | 387 Downloads

Author Notes:

Corresponding Author: David Weinshenker Ph.D., Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Whitehead 301, 615 Michael St., Atlanta, GA 30322, Phone (404) 727-3106, Fax (404) 727-3949, dweinshenker@genetics.emory.edu

The authors would like to thank the Emory University Division of Animal Resources for their exceptional services.

Corticosterone assay services were provided by the Biomarkers Core Laboratory at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center.

DW is co-inventor on a patent concerning the use of selective dopamine βhydroxylase inhibitors for the treatment of cocaine dependence (US-2013-0274303-A1; “Methods and Compositions for Treatment of Drug Addiction”).

The other authors report no biomedical financial interests or potential conflicts of interest.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This research was supported by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (DA015040, DA034867, and DA027535). Ethographic analysis software (Stopwatch+) was generously provided by the Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, a Science and Technology Center Program of the National Science Foundation under agreement IBN-9876754.

This facility is supported by the Yerkes National Primate Research Center Base Grant 2P51RR000165-51.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Psychiatry
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • Cocaine
  • Rat
  • Reinstatement
  • Relapse
  • Social defeat
  • Stress
  • CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING-FACTOR
  • STRIA TERMINALIS
  • BED NUCLEUS
  • ALCOHOL SEEKING
  • SOCIAL DEFEAT
  • D-AMPHETAMINE
  • DRUG RELAPSE
  • BEHAVIOR
  • EXTINCTION
  • RECEPTOR

A Method for Psychosocial Stress-Induced Reinstatement of Cocaine Seeking in Rats

Tools:

Journal Title:

Biological Psychiatry

Volume:

Volume 79, Number 11

Publisher:

, Pages 940-946

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

We describe a novel preclinical model of stress-induced relapse to cocaine use in rats using social defeat stress, an ethologically valid psychosocial stressor in rodents that closely resembles stressors that promote craving and relapse in humans. Rats self-administered cocaine for 20 days. On days 11, 14, 17, and 20, animals were subjected to social defeat stress or a nonstressful control condition following the session, with discrete environmental stimuli signaling the impending event. After extinction training, reinstatement was assessed following re-exposure to these discrete cues. Animals re-exposed to psychosocial stress-predictive cues exhibited increased serum corticosterone and significantly greater reinstatement of cocaine seeking than the control group, and active coping behaviors during social defeat episodes were associated with subsequent reinstatement magnitude. These studies are the first to describe an operant model of psychosocial stress-induced relapse in rodents and lay the foundation for future work investigating its neurobiological underpinnings.

Copyright information:

© 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry.

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Creative Commons License

Export to EndNote