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Author Notes:

Corresponding author Kerry J Ressler, MD PhD, Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Behavioral Neuroscience, Yerkes Research Center, Emory University, 954 Gatewood Rd, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA, Phone: 404-727-7739, Fax: 404-727-8070, kressle@emory.edu

Subject:

Research Funding:

Funding for work in the Ressler lab was provided by the National Institutes of Mental Health (MH096764 to K.J.R.; F32MH090785 to G.M.G.), and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • fear conditioning
  • fear extinction
  • amygdala
  • cell subtype manipulation
  • CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING-FACTOR
  • CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM
  • RAT BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA
  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • CENTRAL EXTENDED AMYGDALA
  • CENTRAL NUCLEUS
  • CONDITIONED FEAR
  • ANXIETY DISORDERS
  • IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION
  • MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION

Mouse Models Of Fear-Related Disorders: Cell-Type-Specific Manipulations In Amygdala

Tools:

Journal Title:

Neuroscience

Volume:

Volume 321

Publisher:

, Pages 108-120

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Fear conditioning is a model system used to study threat responses, fear memory and their dysregulation in a variety of organisms. Newly developed tools such as optogenetics, Cre recombinase and DREADD technologies have allowed researchers to manipulate anatomically or molecularly defined cell subtypes with a high degree of temporal control and determine the effect of this manipulation on behavior. These targeted molecular techniques have opened up a new appreciation for the critical contributions different subpopulations of cells make to fear behavior and potentially to treatment of fear and anxiety disorders. Here we review progress to date across a variety of techniques to understand fear-related behavior through the manipulation of different cell subtypes within the amygdala.

Copyright information:

© 2015 IBRO

This is an Open Access work distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

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