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Author Notes:

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Katie A. Devine, Ph.D., Department of Medicine, Section of Population Sciences, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08903. katie.devine@rutgers.edu

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Research Funding:

This work was supported by funding from the National Cancer Institute (R01CA127488, P30CA072720).

The first author was also supported by funding from the National Cancer Institute (K07CA174728).

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Oncology
  • Health Care Sciences & Services
  • Rehabilitation
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation
  • Psychological care
  • Primary caregiver
  • RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL
  • POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS SYMPTOMS
  • BONE-MARROW-TRANSPLANTATION
  • NEWLY-DIAGNOSED CANCER
  • ADOLESCENT SURVIVORS
  • PARENTS
  • MOTHERS
  • INTERVENTION
  • DISTRESS
  • FAMILIES

Barriers to psychological care among primary caregivers of children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

Tools:

Journal Title:

Supportive Care in Cancer

Volume:

Volume 24, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 2235-2242

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

Purpose: This substudy of an intervention trial aimed to describe barriers to participation in psychological care among primary caregivers of children who were about to undergo a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), including demographic and medical correlates. Method: Three hundred and twelve primary caregivers of children undergoing HSCT who were approached to participate in a psychological intervention trial (n = 218 enrollees and 94 decliners) completed a measure of barriers to psychological care. Results: The most frequently endorsed barriers to care were focusing on the child as priority, not wanting to leave the child’s bedside, and already having adequate psychosocial support. The least frequently endorsed barriers were location, wait times, and stigma around seeking psychological care. Conclusions: Results suggest that explaining how psychological care for a primary caregiver can positively affect their ill child may reduce barriers to seeking needed support services. Certain practical barriers to care may be irrelevant in inpatient settings where psychological support is offered.

Copyright information:

© 2015, Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

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