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Author Notes:

Contact: Shannon L. Gourley, PhD, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Dr. NE, Atlanta GA 30329, 404-727-2482, shannon.l.gourley@emory.edu

S.L.G. and J.R.T. together prepared the manuscript.

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Subjects:

Research Funding:

This work was supported by PHS DA011717, DA027844 (JRT), MH101477, DA034808, and DA036737 (SLG), and the Connecticut Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services (JRT)

The Yerkes National Primate Research Center is supported by the Office of Research Infrastructure Programs/OD P51OD011132.

Keywords:

  • Science & Technology
  • Life Sciences & Biomedicine
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurosciences & Neurology
  • COCAINE-SEEKING BEHAVIOR
  • PHASEOLUS-VULGARIS-LEUKOAGGLUTININ
  • NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS SHELL
  • INDUCED STRUCTURAL PLASTICITY
  • ACCELERATED HABIT FORMATION
  • GOAL-DIRECTED ACTIONS
  • CUE-INDUCED RELAPSE
  • FEAR EXTINCTION
  • INFRALIMBIC CORTEX
  • PRELIMBIC CORTEX

Going and stopping: dichotomies in behavioral control by the prefrontal cortex

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Journal Title:

Nature Neuroscience

Volume:

Volume 19, Number 5

Publisher:

, Pages 656-664

Type of Work:

Article | Post-print: After Peer Review

Abstract:

The rodent dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), specifically the prelimbic cortex (PL), regulates the expression of conditioned fear and behaviors interpreted as reward seeking. Meanwhile, the ventral medial PFC, namely the infralimbic cortex (IL), is essential to extinction conditioning in both appetitive and aversive domains. Here we review evidence that supports, or refutes, this "PL-go/IL-stop" dichotomy. We focus on the extinction of conditioned fear and the extinction and reinstatement of cocaine- or heroin-reinforced responding following abstinence. We then synthesize evidence that the PL is essential for developing goal-directed response strategies, while the IL supports habit behavior. Finally, we propose that some functions of the orbital PFC parallel those of the medial PFC in the regulation of response selection. Integration of these discoveries may provide points of intervention for inhibiting untethered drug seeking in drug use disorders, extinction failures in post-traumatic stress disorder, or co-morbidities between the two.

Copyright information:

© 2016, Rights Managed by Nature Publishing Group

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